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Your search for Animal species returned 330 records. Showing Records 101 to 130. Please Select a Record to View.

 

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Title: Mowachaht/Muchalaht work to protect Tsu-xiit

Year: 2004

Author(s): Dave Wiwchar, Ha-Shilth-Sa

Type: Newspaper Article

Description:
Though the throngs of reporters no longer clog the Gold River docks, and DFO and Vancouver Aquarium staff have long vanished from behind the chain link fence and security gates of the old Bowater Mill site, Tsu-xiit continues to be a fascinating part of life in Nootka Sound. Staying mostly out at Mooyah Bay with the occasional trip to the Gold River docks, Tsu-xiit is still the focus of intense debate, discussion and speculation...

 

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Title: Carnivore-Human Relationship Research Planning Meeting

Year: 2004

Author(s): Jennie Sparkes; Bob Hansen

Type: Other

Description:
none

 

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Title: Attitudes, perception and knowledge: Understanding the human-cougar nexus on the West Coast Trail

Year: 2004

Author(s): Geoff Carrow, Royal Roads University

Type: Academic Thesis

Description:
The purpose of this study is to develop an understanding of the attitudes, perspectives and knowledge of hikers visiting the West Coast Trail of Pacific Rim National Park Reserve of Canada with respect to cougars. The goal is to contribute to the body of knowledge of protected area management to assist wildlife managers in developing carnivore conservation strategies.

 

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Title: Sea lice (Lepeophtheirus salmonis) infection rates on juvenile pink (oncorhynchus gorbuscha) and chum (Oncorhynchus keta) salmon in the nearshore marine environment of British Columbia, Canada.

Year: 2004

Author(s): Alexandra Morton; Richard Routledge; Corey Peet; Aleria Ladwig

Type: Journal Article

Description:
This study compared sea lice (Lepeophtheirus salmonis) infestation rates on juvenile pink (oncorhynchus gorbuscha) and chum (Oncorhynchus keta) salmon in five nearshore areas of the British Columbia coast selected on the basis of proximity to salmon farms. A 10-week study in the Broughton Archipelago found sea lice were 8.8 times more abundant on wild fish near farms holding adult samon and 5.0 times more abundant on wild fish near farms holding smolts than in areas distant from salmon farms. We found that 90% of juvenile pink and chum salmon sampled near salmon farms in the Broughton Archipelago were infected with more than 1.6 lice-(g host mass), a proposed lethal limit when the lice reach mobeile stages. Sea lice abundance was near zero in all areas without salmon farms. Salinity and temperature differences could not account for the higher infestation rates near the fish farms. The most immature life stages dominated the lice population throughout the study, suggesting the source of lice was a stationary, local salmonid population. No such wild population could be identified. The evidence from this control-impact study points to a relationship between salmon farms and sea lice on adjacent, wild, juvenile, salmon.

 

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Title: A Preliminary Investigation of Wolves in the Long Beach Unit of Pacific Rim National Park Reserve

Year: 2004

Author(s): Todd Windle

Type: Report (unpublished)

Description:
This preliminary investigation of wolves in the Long Beach Unit will consist of a sign survey and a review of the PRNPR wildlife database. The sign-survey will focus on documenting presence of wolves, deer, cougar and bear throughout the LBU during November and December 2003. The wildlife database review will focus on estimating the number of wolves occupying the LBU and their diet. The findings of both investigations will be combined in an attempt to guide future, most extensive studies on wolf ecology in PRNPR.

 

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Title: Temporary colonization of Cleland Island, British Columbia, by common murres from 1969-82

Year: 2004

Author(s): Harry R. Carter

Type: Journal Article

Description:
Small numbers of Common Murres (Uria aalge) temporarily bred at Cleland Island on the central west coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia, from 1969-82, but the cirumstances surrounding this brief colonization event have not been previously assessed. This colonization, and breeding attempts at three other nearby sites (Florencia Island, "White" Islet, and Starlight Reef) between the late 1960s and early 1980s, may have reflected a temporary expansion of the murre population form Washington under suitable source population conditions (i.e., after a period of population growth in Washington) and suitable nesting habitat conditiosn at sites along the central west coast of Vancouver Island (i.e., availability of bare rock habitat on predator-free islands with low disturbance). However, long-term breeding did not develop at these colonies. Possible reasons for abandonement include: a) the relatively short period of a few decades of population growth at Washington colonies which ended abruptly in 1983 and was followed by population decline; b) limited suitable breeding habitats on the central west coast of Vancouver Island, contributing to small colony size without growth and sufficient recruitment; c0 disturbance of breeding birds by humans and Bald Eaagles (Haliateetus leucocephalus); and d) mortality of breeding birds or their progeny from natural mortality, gill-net fishing, and oil spills.

 

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Title: Eelgrass watchers hold workshop.

Year: 2003

Author(s): Erin Riley, The Westerly Newspaper

Type: Newspaper Article

Description:
The Marine and Aquatic Committee (MAC) of the Clayoquot Biosphere Trust (CBT) has only met twice, but it has already set its sights on a regional eelgrass survey. The survey will include aerial photos and field studies of eelgrass beds, and will depend on community involvement, which is why the CBT hosted last week's workshop that introduced 12 locals to eelgrass ecosystems.

 

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Title: Rare Nootka Sound Abalone could foil fish farm plans.

Year: 2003

Author(s): Brian Tate, Ha-shilth-sa Newspaper

Type: Newspaper Article

Description:
A recent discovery of Abalone in Nootka Sound could prevent Grieg Seafoods from attaining its controversial goal of establishing fish farms in Mowachaht / Muchalaht territories near Gold River.

 

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Title: Spatial and temporal variation of eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) fish communities in Clayoquot Sound.

Year: 2003

Author(s): Jennifer Yakimishyn

Type: Academic Thesis

Description:
M.Sc thesis, University of Victoria, Department of Geography.

 

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Title: Haida Chief wants seal kill

Year: 2003

Author(s): Dave Wiwchar, Ha-Shilth-Sa

Type: Newspaper Article

Description:
Tsahaheh - With seal populations doubling and salmon runs vanishing, some fishermen are calling for a resumption of a seal kill program, last seen on the BC coast in the 1960's, and many believe First Nations are perfectly positioned to make such a program possible. "We have a serious overpopulation of seal along our coast and something has to be done soon," said Skidegate Chief Roy Jones Jr. "A seal kill industry would benefit our people and benefit the salmon our people depend on," he said during a recent visit to the west coast of Vancouver Island....

 

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Title: Tsuux-iit (Luna) brings attention

Year: 2003

Author(s): Brian Tate, Ha-Shilth-Sa

Type: Newspaper Article

Description:
Nootka Sound - The popularity of the whale known as Luna or Tsuux-iit to the Mowachaht / Muchalaht people has grown immensely through all the coverage by various types of media be it radio, newspaper and or television...

 

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Title: Seagull egg harvesting at Bare Island

Year: 2003

Author(s): Denise Ambrose, Ha-Shilth-Sa

Type: Newspaper Article

Description:
Near Ahousaht - Harvesting seagull eggs is a practice several families in Ahousaht have engaged in for generations. On a warm June afternoon, a herring skiff bounces over the ocean waves carrying its eight occupants to Bare Island. Located about halfway between Ahousaht and Tofino, Bare Island is one of the western most islets off of Vargas Island. Barren of trees, Bare Island is mostly rock jutting out of the ocean capped with tufts of grass, weeds and shrubs. A favoured nesting site, seagulls swirl around the island, white-washing the black rock with their excrement...

 

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Title: Status of Roosevelt Elk (Cervus elapus roosevelti) in British Columbia

Year: 2003

Author(s): J. F. Quayle; K. R. Brunt; BC Ministry of Water, Land and Air Protection, Biodiversity Branch; BC Ministry of Sustainable Resources Management, Conservation Data Centre

Type: Report (published)

Description:
none

 

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Title: A Case History of Wolf-Human Encounters in and Around Pacific Rim National Park Reserve (1978-2003)

Year: 2003

Author(s): Todd Windle, University of Northern BC

Type: Report (unpublished)

Description:
Introduction: Previous reviews of wolf-human encounters have found that wild, healthy wolves present little threat to humans, and that aggression towards humans is rare (McNay 2002). However, this view has been challenged due to recent attacks on humans by wolves (McNay 2002). The purpose of this case history review of wolf encounters in and around Pacific Rim National Park Reserve (PRNPR) is to aid park staff in future management decisions. I queried the PRNPR wildlife database for all wolf records, both inside and outside of the park boundary. I then reviewed these records to ensure that no records of observations were actually encounters, and that no records of encounters were actually observations. This resulted in 52 records of wolf encounters from January 1983 to September 2003. McNay (2002) categorised wolf behaviour into 5 categories of aggressive behaviour and 2 categories of non-aggressive behaviour. Because many of the records in the PRNPR wildlife database are lacking a full description of the event, I was only able categorise the records as aggressive or non-aggressive behaviour. I also added an additional category of aggressive behaviour towards dogs because of the high frequency of records containing this type of behaviour. There were 22 records of aggressive behaviour, 13 records of non-aggressive behaviour, and 17 records of aggressive behaviour toward dogs. It should be made clear that this report only contains those records of wolf encounters in the PRNPR database. It is possible that other encounters have happened during this time in the same general area that are not documented in the database.

 

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Title: Multi-scale Studies of Popluations, Distribution and Habitat Associations of Marbled Murrelets in Clayoquot Sound, BC

Year: 2002

Author(s): Alan E. Burger; Trudy Chatwin

Type: Report (published)

Description:
None

 

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Title: Tofino Mudflats Wildlife Management Area Management Plan

Year: 2002

Author(s): M. Eggen; S. Diggon; A. Mason

Type: Report (unpublished)

Description:
A management plan for the Tofino Mudflats Wildlife Management Area (WMA) was initiated by the BC Ministry of Water, Land and Air Protection (MWLAP). The main objectives of the management plan were to provide a current ecological and human use description, an integrated management strategy that strives to protect the natural resources of the WMA, and a plan for a wildlife viewing network. Current information on ecological and human use was collected from existing documented sources and through consultations with the public, local governments and organizations. A consultation process was initiated in order to gather and incorporate community input in planning for management of the WMA. The Tofino Mudflats WMA is defined by its jurisdictional boundaries; however, it is ecologically connected with surrounding marine and terrestrial environments at local, regional and international levels. These connects are reflected in the management plan.

 

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Title: Spring Shorebird Migration at Tofino Mudflats.

Year: 2001

Author(s): Moira Lemon, Canadian Wildlife Service; Rob Butler, Canadian Wildlife Service

Type: Journal Article

Description:
This articles presents the results of a shorebird census (spring abundance) conducted in the spring of 1995.

 

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Title: Fish Stocks of the Pacific Coast

Year: 2001

Author(s): Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Type: Book

Description:
none

 

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Title: Noninvasive Approaches to Reduce Human-Cougar Conflict in Protected Areas on the West Coast of Vancouver Island

Year: 2001

Author(s): Danielle Thompson, University of Northern BC

Type: Academic Thesis

Description:
Cougars (Puma concolor) are a growing concern for managers of Pacific Rim National Park Reserve and Clayoquot Sound UNESCO Biosphere Reserve on the west coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Since the mid-1990s, the frequency and intensity of human-cougar interactions have dramatically increased. Concurrently, these areas have become increasingly popular for human activities. The primary goal of my study was to recommend ways to reduce the potential risk of human-cougar interactions to ensure long-term conservation of cougars while minimizing risks to visitor safety...

 

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Title: Restoration Plans: Kennedy Flats

Year: 2001

Author(s): Warren Warttig, Interfor; Dave Clough, D.R. CLough Consulting Ltd.; Mike Leslie, Mike Leslie Consulting

Type: Report (unpublished)

Description:
Executive Summary: Restoration plans are developed to aid in the recovery of both terrestrial and aquatic habitats. In order for a restoration plan to be successful all relevant factors must be considered. The most common factor associated with declines of anadromous salmonids is habitat degradation, however a number of other factors play a key role. Many factors, such as habitat loss and degradation, over exploitation in sport and commercial fisheries, global warming and variable ocean conditions, are responsible to a varying degree for the depressed status of salmonids. Restoration of upslope and fluvial processes that create and maintain habitats must be integratl components of any recovery program. This report is limited to the unhealthy ecosystems of upslope, road, stream function, and riparian areas, and does not address fish harvest management, global warming, or variable ocean conditions. Stable landscape units outside the riparian zone are also not addressed in this report, but their status may have minor implications for stream ecosystems. Salmon have evolved to adapt to a series of natural impacts, therefore timber harvesting plans should be encouraged, where possible, to mimic the natural disturbance regimes. Examples of natural disturbance regimes could be: blow down (windstorms cause major natural disturbance to forest in Clayoquot Sound), wildfires, encouraging uneven aged standes to develop from even aged second growth, etc. The Clayoquot Sound Scientific Panel (CSSP) recommendations call for salmon recovery efforts to be based on restoring and conserving ecosystems, rather than simply restoring hte instream habitat attributes. Thi sis important, as relationships between habitat conditions and individual salmonid response have been well established within the habitat unit, stream reach and to the watershed unit as well.

 

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Title: Differences in Cd elimination from Mytilus californianus and Mytilus trossulus soft tissues

Year: 2001

Author(s): M. L. Lares; K. J. Orians

Type: Journal Article

Description:
Field results have shown that Mytilus californianus is able to release its Cd concentrations significantly in just a few days. The existing paradigm states that Cd elimination from Mytilus soft tissues is a very slow process. This discrepancy was investigated in the laboratory, testing the effect of two Cd levels on its release from Mytilus trossulus and M. californianus soft tissues. After exposure ..., both species showed a significant uptake with no elimination after several days of depuration. After exposure to ..., the responses were different. No significant Cd uptake was seen in M. trossulus while in M. californianus uptake was significant but returned to the background level after just 1 day of depuration. This reponse of M. californianus is consistent with that reported from field studies. These results are important for environmental monitoring programs since M. californianus has been used as equivalent to other Mytilus species in the assessment of Cd pollution.

 

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Title: The Effects of Variable Removal Levels of the Sea Urchin, Strongylocentrotus faciscanus, on near-shore rocky communities in the traditional territory of the Hesquiat First Nation

Year: 2001

Author(s): Robert C. Mooney, California State Polytechnic University

Type: Academic Thesis

Description:
The shallow subtidal regions near Hot Springs Cove, Vancouver Isalnd, British Columbia are characterized by large rocky areas dominated by the red sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus franciscanus. S. franciscanus were removed at three sites with four levels of urchin removal per site. Manipulations of urchin density were maintained throughout the experiment and monitored seasonally for two seasons pre-treatment and seven seasons post-treatment. The manipulations resulted in increased gonad indices of remaining red sea urchins and caused the conversion of urchin dominated subtidal regions into kelp dominated communities with greater fish abundance. As well, a feeding experiment illustrated that the depressed gonad indices of field-collected urchins resulted from limited food resources in areas of high urchin density. The removal of sea urchins at all levels results in a rapid increase in the presence of laminarialean algal species (kelps). Study plots where all urchins were removed developed a dense understory and seasonal canopy of kelps with little bare rock remaining. Intermediate levels of removal resulted in a mosaic of smaller urchin-dominated and kelp-dominated patches. Control plots tended to maintain the urchin-dominated barrens-state throughout the study period. Sea urchins that were fed M. intergrifolia during the feeding experiment showed 2.9 and 2.4 times greater gonadal development by weight than urchins collected from the field before and after the feeding trial, respectively. These results suggest that food limitation is an important factor in the gonadal development of this urchin population. Findings suggest that with supplemental feeding, the resource base of sea urchins could be expanded to include barren habitats. The removal of S. franciscanus at all levels results in an increase in the fecundity (measured as gonad index) for the sea urchins that remained, as well as for the urchins that reinvaded the total removal plots. All study plots showed an increase in gonad index over time, but the increase in gonad index was statistically greater for urchins in removal plots versus the control plots. The results indicate that small isolated urchin removals can have measurable effects on the fishery value of nearby urchins. Of the seven fish species monitored, pile perch, striped seaperch, kelp perch and black rockfish were most associated with kelp forest habitat. Kelp greenling, lingcod and copper rockfish showed no association with kelp forest habitat. The experimental approach taken indicates that sea urchin removal, and subsequent kelp growth, determined relative fish abundance. High densities of S. franciscanus appear to be responsible for the absence of kelp forest habitat in the region, the depressed fecundity (gonad index) of S. franciscanus, and the abundance of some fish species. The effect of urchin removal is discussed in regards to the implications for ecological theory as well as sea urchin fisheries management.

 

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Title: Foraging patterns of gray whales in central Clayoquot Sound, British Columbia, Canada

Year: 2001

Author(s): Jason S. Dunham, Whale Research Laboratory, UVic; David A. Duffus, Whale Research Laboratory, UVic

Type: Journal Article

Description:
Gray whales, Eschrichtius robustus, forage in parts of Clayoquot Sound on several prey species in different habitats. Between June and September in 1996 and 1997 we carried out analyses of the density, biomass and other measures of their primary prey species, and of whales' movement patterns in response to prey characteristics. The prey base consists of hyper-benthic mysids (family Mysidae), pelagic porcelain crab larvae (4 spp. of family Porcellanidae), benthic amphids (family Ampeliscidae) and benthic ghost shrimp, Callianassa californiensis. Whales foraged primarily for mysids, switch to porcelain crab larvae in August, and then to amphipods even later in teh season when these organisms increased in body size. In 1997, whales rapidly switched from feeding on planktonic to benthic prey during mid-August. Sampling indicated low numbers of mysids and crab larvae at that time. Selection of amphipod prey was based on high biomass and a high proportion of individuals less than 6 mm in length. In parts of the study area gray whales did not return to forage on benthic amphipods when this size criteria was not met. A single whale departed from a ghost shrimp feeding ground because its search time for food was long, it achieved only a low biomass removal rate, and it was not able to find sufficient food each day. We show that gray whales are dynamic and selective foragers that switch prey and foraging tactics rapidly to take advantage of short-term availability of energy.

 

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Title: Assessment of the 1999 chinook salmon escapement to the Gold River watershed using mark-recapture and area-under-the-curve estimation.

Year: 2000

Author(s): J.A. Taylor, J.A. Taylor and Associates Ltd.; Roger Dunlop, Nuu chah nulth Tribal Council Fisheries Department

Type: Report (published)

Description:
This report is the second in a series designed to investigate the feasibility of establishing an index of chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) escapement to the Gold River, using area-under-the-curve (AUC) estimation through swim surveys. 48pp.

 

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Title: First Nations' Perspectives on Wildlife Inventories in Clayoquot Sound

Year: 2000

Author(s): Barbara Beasley; Ruth Ogilview; Crystal Sutherland

Type: Report (unpublished)

Description:
None