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Your search for Animal species returned 330 records. Showing Records 151 to 180. Please Select a Record to View.

 

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Title: Wildlife Diversity in British Columbia: Distribution and Habitat Use of Amphibians, Reptiles, Birds, and Mammals in Biogeoclimatic Zones

Year: 1995

Author(s): Victoria Stevens

Type: Report (published)

Description:
Report summarizes basic and essential information on terrestrial vertebrates in British Columbia and is intended for wildlife managers and other workers in resource management.

 

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Title: Inviting the Salmon Home: The Kennedy Lake Sockeye Project

Year: 1995

Author(s): Ian Gill, Ecotrust Canada; Rita Fromholt, Ecotrust Canada

Type: Report (published)

Description:
This pamphlet reviews fisheries of Kennedy Lake

 

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Title: Potential Western Hemisphere Shorebird Reserve Network Sites for Shorebirds in Canada

Year: 1995

Author(s): R.I.G. Morrison; R.W. Butler; G.W. Beyersbergen; H.L. Dickson; A. Bourget; P.W. Hicklin; J.P. Goossen; R.K. Ross; C.L. Trevor-Gratto

Type: Report (published)

Description:
The Western Hemisphere Shorebird Reserve Network (WHSRN) is an international conservation initiative designed to protect the key habitats and resources used by shorebirds throughout their migration ranges. Many species of shorebirds depend on a chain of critically important sites to complete their annual migrations, and for conservation to be successful, all the links in the chain need to be preserved. This report provides an updated inventory of potential WHSRN sites in non-Arctic areas of Canada. It summarizes information currently available on locations meeting criteria for inclusion in the Western Hemisphere Shorebird Reserve Network both for a wide range of shorebird species found on migration and for the endangered Piping Plover, Charadrius melodus.

 

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Title: An Observational Study of Black Bears on Jenny's Beach in Shelter Inlet, Clayoquot Sound

Year: 1995

Author(s): Karen Oldershaw

Type: Student Paper

Description:
Introduction: The American Black Bear (Ursus americanus), is an adaptable species, existing in a variety of regions, throughout North America. In the coastal ecosystems of British Columbia, diversity of environments offer abundant habitat to resident bears. In particular, interactions between terrestrial and marine environments produce plentiful food resources in estuaries and intertidal zones. There has been little research conducted on the importance of intertidal habitat to terrestrial mammals, like the Black bear. Herrero (1980) states that, in coastal areas, Black and Grizzly bears readily forage in the biologically rich intertidal zone, where they eat crabs and other marine invertebrates. Research conducted in Glacier Bay National Park, Alaska, shows that Black bears congregate along gently sloping beaches in spring and early summer. For the bears of Glacier Bay, beach habitat offers foods such as beach wild rye (Elymus) and sedges. Barnacles (Balanus) are considered an important food item. Modafferi also made observations of Black bear use of coastal marshes and beaches, where bears foraged on grasses and sedges in the spring. For several years, casual observations have been made of Black bears along the shorelines in Clayoquot Sound, on the west coast of Vancouver Island. Historical evidence of Black bear use of the intertidal zone is primarily anecdotal. It suggests that such areas are frequently visited by Black bears inhabiting the region. Prevou observations of Black bears along shorelines seem to indicate that most bear activity occurs during periods of low tide, at which time bears appear to forage for extended periods. Foraging behaviou, observed in the past, has focussed on the consumption of shore crabs, eels, barnacles and even starfish. Black bears have also been seen travelling, resting and interacting with other bears. The purpose of this study was to make a preliminary scientific investigation into Black bear use of the intertidal zone at Jenny's Beach, in the northern region of Clayoquot Soun. An observational study was conducted for a period of several weeks in order to compile quantitative data of the bears' daily activities. Qualitative and quantitative descriptions of behaviour were also made throughout the study period.

 

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Title: Man Attacked by Sea Lion

Year: 1995

Author(s): Jolanda Waskito

Type: Newspaper Article

Description:
none

 

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Title: Condition Assessment of the Kennedy-Muriel Waterdhed

Year: 1994

Author(s): Kennedy lake Resoration Group; Mark Johannes

Type: Report (unpublished)

Description:
From the introduction:"This submission from Kennedy Restoration Group to the Watershed Restoration Program is for stream based condition assessments of the Kennedy-Muriel watersheds, located within Clayoquot Sound on the West Coast of Vancouver Island."

 

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Title: Clayoquot Lake Natural History Notes

Year: 1994

Author(s): Clayoquot Biosphere Project; Tom Stere; Garth Lenz; Ursula Kunz

Type: Map

Description:
Maps with hand-written notes on natural history observations.

 

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Title: Breeding competition in a pacific salmon (Coho: Oncorhynchus Kisutch): Measures of natural and sexual selection

Year: 1994

Author(s): Ian A. Fleming; Mart R. Gross

Type: Journal Article

Description:
In the breeding system of Pacific salmon, females compete for oviposition territories, and males compete to fertilize eggs. The natural selection in females and sexual selection in males likely has been responsible for their elaborate breeding morphologies and the dimorphism between the sexes. We quantified direct-selection intensities during breeding on mature coho salmon (Oncorhynchus Kisutch), measured for seven phenotypic characters, including three secondary sexual characters. We found that without competition, natural selection acts only on female body size for increased egg production; there is no detectable selection on males for the phenotypic distribution we used. In males, competition increased the opportunity for selection 52-fold, which was nine times greater than for females.

 

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Title: Juvenile Sockeye and Lake Survey Status Report to the Tla-o-qui-aht/DFO Fisheries Working Group

Year: 1994

Author(s): Kim D. Hyatt; D. Paul Rankin; Mark R. S. Johannes; Scott P. Murdoch

Type: Report (unpublished)

Description:
none

 

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Title: Catalogue of Major Salmon-Producing Rivers of Clayoquot Sound, 1953-1994

Year: 1994

Author(s): Dept. of Fisheries and Oceans

Type: Report (unpublished)

Description:
none

 

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Title: Phenotypic Divergence of Sea-ranched, Farmed, and Wild Salmon

Year: 1994

Author(s): Ian A. Fleming, Norwegian Institute of Nature Research; Mart R. Gross, University of Toronto; Bror Jonsson, Norwegian Institute of Nature Research

Type: Journal Article

Description:
We quantified divergence in phenotype of sea-ranched, farmed, and wild Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) of a common genetic stock (River Isma, Norway). These first-generation fish were also contrasted with a fifth-generation farmed population (Norwegian commercial strain) and with wild and multigeneration sea-ranched populations of coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch). In comparisons using mature Atlantic salmon male parr, cultured juveniles had smaller heads and fins and narrower caudal peduncles and could be distinguished from wild juveniles with 100% accuracy. When juveniles were reared to adulthood in the natural marine environment, some environmentally induced differences due to juvenile hatchery rearing persisted by many disappeared. This was particularly true for head and trunk morphology. Greater adult divergence from the wild state was observed in multigeneration sea-ranched coho salmon, suggesting that evolutionary changes may accumulate with time. Continued farming of salmon juveniles through adulthood increased environmentally induced phenotypic divergence considerably. Both rayed-fn sizes and body streamlining decreased. Fifth-generation Norwegian farmed salmon showed the greatest morphological differences. Both the proportion of a fish's life history and number of generations spent in culture are thus probably important determinants of phenotypic divergence of cultured fish from their wild state.

 

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Title: An Assessment of the Vertebrate Ecology of the Tofino Creek Watershed, Vancouver Island, BC

Year: 1994

Author(s): Todd E. Manning, Branta Educational Consultants

Type: Report (unpublished)

Description:
"A one year research project was conducted in the Tofino Creek watershed on western Vancouver Island, British Columbia, during the spring and summer of 1992. The major objectives of this study were to determine the presence and absence of mammals, birds, and amphibians found in different coastal western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla) and mountain hemlock (T. mertensiana) habitats in the watershed, and to compare the relative abundance of forest birds living in these habitats. Specific surveys were conducted for forest spring breeding birds, salamanders, small mammals, owls, and Marbled Murrelets (Brachyramphus marmoratus). Fifty-two species of birds were detected in eight habitat types throughout the valley between May and July, 1992.

 

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Title: The Odonoata of the Clayoquot River System, Vancouver Island, British Columbia

Year: 1994

Author(s): Janna Smit; Volker Homes

Type: Report (unpublished)

Description:
This is a study on mayflies and dragonflies at Clayoquot Lake and the Clayoquot River System on the west coast of Vancouver Island. The Odonata on the outer west coast of British Columbia is little known. Especially for the middle and north part of Vancouver Island there are few records dealing with this order of insects. The data were collected from August 2 to August 23, 1994 in the Clayoquot Sound area, reachable only by floatplane. Adult mayflies and dragonflies and their exuviae were collected in different habitats and identified and ecological observations on these species were added. This study is a part of a long-term ecosystem research program in the Clayoquot Valley founded by the Clayoquot Biosphere Project.

 

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Title: Isolation of Remaining Populations of the Native Frog, Rana muscosa, by Introduced Fishes in Sequoia and Kings canyon National Parks, California

Year: 1993

Author(s): David F Bradford; et. al.

Type: Journal Article

Description:
None

 

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Title: Stream Analysis and Fish Habitat Design: A Field Manual

Year: 1993

Author(s): Robert Newbury; Marc N. Gaboury

Type: Book

Description:
A manual for stream habitat projects, stream analysis and design procedures.

 

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Title: Stream Analysis and Fish Habitat Design

Year: 1993

Author(s): Robert W. Newbury; Marc N. Gaboury

Type: Book

Description:
Planning stream habitat projects. Field exploration. The evaluation of stream behaviour and characteristics. Design and construction of stream habitat works.

 

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Title: Clayoquot Lake Natural History Observations

Year: 1993

Author(s): Clayoquot Biosphere Project; Jim Darling; Tom Stere; Josie Cleland; J Bonnell; A Dhanwant; Adrian Dorst; David Bout; Claudette Poirier; Tammy Steeves

Type: Map

Description:
Collection of naturalist notes from observations at Clayoquot Lake.

 

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Title: Clayoquot Lake and Upper Clayoquot River Spawner Enumeration 24-27 November, 1993

Year: 1993

Author(s): Mike Morrell

Type: Report (unpublished)

Description:
None

 

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Title: Status of Keen's Long-eared Myotis in British Columbia

Year: 1993

Author(s): M. Firman; M. Getty; R.M.R. Barclay

Type: Report (unpublished)

Description:
"Keen's Long-eared Myotis (Myotis keenii) is restricted to the coastal forests of the United States and Canadian Pacific Northwest, and has one of the smallest geographical ranges of any North American species of bat. It is also one of the most poorly understood. Virtually nothing is known about even its basic biology. In a field survey of coastal BC conducted during summer 1991, we captured and released 29 M. keeni at a nursery colony discovered among geothermally heated boulders on Hot Spring Island (Ganndl Kin) in the Queen Charlotte Islands (Haida Gwaii). This the first record of a maternity colony for the species.

 

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Title: Marbled Murrelets Mysterious Shorebirds

Year: 1993

Author(s): Mavis Jones

Type: Book

Description:
none

 

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Title: Breeding Success of Hatchery and Wild Coho Salmon (Oncorhynchus Kisutch) in Competition

Year: 1993

Author(s): Ian A. Fleming; Mart R. Gorss; Mart R. Gross

Type: Journal Article

Description:
The divergence of hatchery fish in traits important for reproductive success has raised concerns about their ability to rehabilitate wild populations, and the threat that their inevitable straying poses to biological diversity through introgression. We therefore undertook a study of the breeding competition and success of sea-ranched hatchery fish placed in direct competition with wild fish. Experiments using wild and hatchery coho salmon (Oncorhynchus Kisutch) were conducted within a controlled stream channel, allowing selective manipulation of breeding competition and density. Hatchery fish, particularly males, were competitively inferior to wild fish, being less aggressive and more submissive. These results imply that hatchery fish have restricted abilities to rehabilitate wild populations, and may pose ecological and genetic threats to the conservation of wild populations.

 

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Title: Roosevelt Elk Selection of Temperate Rain Forest Seral Stages in Western Washington

Year: 1993

Author(s): Greg L. Schroer; Kurt J. Jenkins; Bruce B. Moorhead

Type: Journal Article

Description:
We studied habitat selection by Roosevelt elk (Cervus elaphus roosevelti) in a temperate rain forest in the lower Quuets River Valley of the western Olympic Peninsul, Washington from June 1986-June 1987. Elk annual home ranges included predominantly unlogged forests protected within Olympic National Park and logged, regenerating forests adjacent to the park. Radio-collared elk selected valley floors during all seasons except winter, when elk frequently used an adjoining plateau 60 m above the flodplain. In winter, radio-collared elk selected 6-15 year-old clearcuts, which were available on the plateau. Elk selected mature deciduous forests of the valley floor during spring, summer, and autumn, and generally they selected old-age Sitka spruce forests during autumn and winter. Young clearcuts (1-5 years old) and even-aged, regenerated stands (16-150 years old) generally were avoided during all seasons.

 

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Title: Observations of transient orcas (Orcinus orca) in Clayoquot Sound, British Columbia 1991-1993

Year: 1993

Author(s): Rod Palm

Type: Report (unpublished)

Description:
none

 

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Title: Clayoquot Sound Wildlife Sighting Survey 1993

Year: 1993

Author(s): Kumar Biswas

Type: Report (unpublished)

Description:
Introduction: In 1993, the Clayoquot Biosphere Project initiated a program to document wildlife sightings in Clayoquot Sound, Vancouver Island. The program was intended to determine which species are commonly sighted, in what season, and the location of prime habitat. The program relies on the participation of local residents, including charter boat skippers, pilots, kayak tour guides and tourists. A database of local knowledge of wildlife, developed from opportunistic sightings and regular field surveys, will assist in monitoring natural patterns and variation, and the impacts of human disturbance. Clayoquot Sound is the largest remaining tract of semi-intact coastal temperate rainforest on Vancouver Island. This provides an opportunity to collect wildlife sightings in the context of a natural ecosystem.

 

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Title: Clayoquot Sound: An Introduction to Natural History Observations

Year: 1993

Author(s): Jennifer Bonnell; Ashley Dhanwant

Type: Student Paper

Description:
This study was undertaken to explore the methods and principles of natural history observation. Surveys were conducted of lake and river wildlife and conditions, and of inland plant diversity and distribution. Goldeneyes and mergansers were the most frequently observed bird species on the lake, while Western hemlock and red huckleberry dominated the inland vegetative ecosystem. The activity of several mammals was also observed and discussed in context to their habitat requirements. The sensitivity of the area in early Spring should be considered when scheduling human activity time frames in wilderness regions.