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Your search for Animal species returned 330 records. Showing Records 201 to 230. Please Select a Record to View.

 

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Title: Daily Foraging Behavior of marbled murrelets

Year: 1990

Author(s): Harry Carter; Spencer Sealy

Type: Journal Article

Description:
Patterns of at-sea dispersion, flocking, distributions, flights, and fish-holding behavior of marbled murrelets (Brachyramphus marmoratus) in Barkley Sound, British Columbia, were synthesized into a descriptive model of daily foraging behavior. Murrelets were clumped in coastal and sill areas in Trevor Channel and used the same feeding sites each day. Adults rearing nestlings flew to and aggregated at feeding sites at or before dawn, fed themselves there early in the day, flew to other areas later in the day to search for prey for nestlings, and returned to nest sites to feed chicks mainly at or after dusk. At this time, adult murrelets minimized time required to feed themselves by specializing on abundant and easily-found prey. Consequently, this maximized time to obtain prey for nestlings, which were less abundant and more difficult to locate. This system may be facilitated by solitary foraging.

 

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Title: Natural Selection Resulting from Female Breeding Competition in a Pacific Salmon (coho: Oncorhynchus Kisutch)

Year: 1989

Author(s): Eric P. van der Berghe; Mart R. Gross

Type: Journal Article

Description:
We studied breeding competition among wild female coho salmon (Oncorhynchus Kisutch) and quantified natural selection acting on two important female characters: body size and kype size (a secondary sexual character used for fighting). The strong natural selection that we have found for female competitive ability is presumably the basis for the evolution of female parental care in salmonids.

 

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Title: Animal Behavior

Year: 1989

Author(s): John Alcock

Type: Book

Description:
From the introduction:" For hundreds of years, humans observed animals for a thoroughly practical reason: their lives depended on a knowledge of animal behavior. Today we can indulge ourselves for the thoroughly impractical reason that this is a topic that happens to be fascinating and understandable."

 

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Title: Role of nest raiding and egg predation in regulating population density of threespine sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) in a coastal British Columbia lake

Year: 1989

Author(s): K. D. Hyatt; N. H. Ringler

Type: Journal Article

Description:
The consequences of nest raiding and egg predation for population regulation of sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) were studied in a British Columbia coastal lake. Stickleback eggs were present in the stomachs of 23 and 11% of all sticklebacks sampled in the field in 1982 and 1985 respectively. On average, males consumed more eggs than females did. Seasonal egg consumption increased with increases in stickleback density in breeding colonies. Our evidence suggests that both nest raiding and egg cannibalism are important in limiting the production of stickleback fry as population density increases in scattered, lakeshore, breeding colonies of Kennedy Lake.

 

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Title: Effects of ocean variability on the abundance of Dungeness crab (Cancer magister) megalopae

Year: 1989

Author(s): G.S. Jamieson; A.C. Phillips; W.S. Huggett

Type: Journal Article

Description:
The longshore and cross-shelf abundance of Cancer crab megalopae have been studied off the south coast of Vancouver Island since 1985. Megalopae occur in abundance from about 28 km to at least 170 km offshore, well beyond the general location (70 km offshore) of the continental shelf break (200 m depth). Environmental factors influencing the movement of megalopae have been investigated by documenting surface current patters in the study area by means of drifters. Results indicate that the patterns of currents and their relative velocities in the study areas differ oin an annual basis. It appears that these current patterns affect where crab megalopae are concentrated in abundance and their subsequent ability to move onshore.

 

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Title: Salmon escapement records for Area 24, 1967-1989

Year: 1989

Author(s): Dept. of Fisheries and Oceans

Type: Dataset (unpublished)

Description:
none

 

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Title: Fish Survey of S.E. Clayoquot Sound Streams, Vancouver Island

Year: 1989

Author(s): T.G. Brown; B.C. Anderson; J.C. Scrivener; I.V. Williams

Type: Report (published)

Description:
Minnow traps were used to capture juvenile salmonids from six locations in each of the twenty-three S.E. Clayoquot Sound Streams. At each location the environmental features were noted, recorded, and scales were obtained for salmonid age determination. Juvenile coho catch/effort, mean length of one stream surveyed. The mean catch at each location was correlated to various environmental features such as: dominant biogeoclimatic variant, gradient, stream order, stream orientation and stream location.

 

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Title: Bald Eagle Nesting Relative to Forestry Operations on MacMillan Bloedel Forest Lands

Year: 1989

Author(s): Elaine ONeil

Type: Academic Thesis

Description:
Portions of the Gulf Islands, Johnstone Strait and the west coast of Vancouver island were surveyed to determine the locations and productivity of nesting bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) and impacts of logging on nesting success. A total of 131 nests were located of which 43 were active. Of these,69 nests were surveyed on the ground to collect nest tree, site and stand data. Information on the distance to and impact of forestry practices was collected where possible. On average, no significant differences in bald eagle use of nests were found between disturbed and undisturbed areas. No significant differences in tree, site, and stand characteristics were found between active and inactive nests. There were significantly more young produced/active nest in undisturbed areas. Nest tree size was significantly larger in disturbed areas. Based on these findings and research in the U.S., interim guidelines are suggested for B.C. Future management directions should emphasize reaching consensus on the amount of habitat that should be retained in B.C., on identifying the most suitable habitat for eagles, and on monitoring the population to determine more thoroughly the impact of forest harvesting.

 

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Title: Winter diet of Vancouver Island marten (Martes americana)

Year: 1989

Author(s): David W. Nagorsen; Karen F. Morrison; Joan E. Forsberg

Type: Journal Article

Description:
Digestive tracts from 701 martens (Martes americana) of known sex and age taken during the 1983-1986 fur harvests were used to determine winter diet of marten from Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Small mammals, deer, birds and salmonid fish were the major food items. Marten exploited nine species of small mammals including four introduced species, but more than 50% of the small mammal prey were deer mice. We attributed most deer remains to carrion. Avian prey was primarily small passerine and piciform species with Winter Wrens accounting for about 40% of the identifiable bird remains. Salmon remains were from bait consumption and fish exploited during the spawning runs. Although minor intersexual variation in diet was evident with females consuming more small mammals and small birds, dietary overlap between sexes was pronounced in this insular population.

 

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Title: International Biological Programme: Conservation of Terrestrial Biological Communities

Year: 1989

Author(s): R. Ogilvie; H. Roemer; J. Pinder-Moss

Type: Report (unpublished)

Description:
none

 

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Title: Growth, reproduction and longevity of blue mussels (Mytilus edulis): implications to northeastern Pacific mussel culture

Year: 1989

Author(s): G. S. Jamieson

Type: Journal Article

Description:
Mytilus edulis is a circumboreal species in the northern hemisphere with significant life history differences between stocks from the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. Mussels from British Columbia have both higher growth and mortality rates in their first year than do most mussel strains from the Atlantic. The mortality rate of the 1-yr old mussels also increases dramatically after their first spawning. The poor survival of adult mussels has adversely affected the development of the mussel culture industry in British Columbia. Implications of population differences are discussed in the context of both mussel physiology and ecology and the long-term prospects for mussel culture in British Columbia. The production of triploid or exotic blue mussel seed from hatcheries is considered as an alternative to natural seed collection.

 

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Title: Strathcona Provincial Park: Natural and Cultural History Themes

Year: 1989

Author(s): Betty Brooks

Type: Report (unpublished)

Description:
NONE

 

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Title: The vocal repertoire of the ancient Murrelet

Year: 1989

Author(s): Ian Jones, University of Toronto; Bruce Falls; Anthony Gaston

Type: Journal Article

Description:
We investigated the vocalizations of the Ancient Murrelet (Synthliboramphus antiguus), a seabird of the North Pacific. To determine how the size and structure of their vocal repertoire relates to their nocturnal activity at breeding colonies. Nine distinct vocal displays were found, a repertoire of similar size to that of two other alcid species and several passerines. Most vocalizations consisted of broad band sounds with rapid frequency and amplitude modulation. The chirrup call, a short (0.5 sec) vocalization performed in many situations, did not differ in use or structure between the sexes. Chirrups had great individual stereotype in structure, important in individual recognition of parents by young and possibly between mates. Song, a complex vocal display performed by males, was usually given from perches high in trees in the colony. Song may function in courtship and mate attraction, but apparently not for defense of long-lasting territories. Several song variants were recorded, at least one of which appeared to function as an agonistic signal to other males. Ancient Murrelet vocalizations have simple 'combinatorial' properties in that they consist of a few acoustic elements combined in various sequences to produce vocal displays with different functions. Although there was little evidence that the Ancient Murrelet repertoire was larger than those of other alcids, the vocalizations were structurally more complex and include the song-like male advertising display. This likely relates to the nocturnal timing of social behavior of this species, which must restrict the usefulness of visual displays. We conclude that Ancient Murrelet vocal signals exhibit a number of adaptions to the unusual habits of this nocturnal, forest-nesting seabird.

 

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Title: Carnation Creek

Year: 1989

Type: Journal Article

Description:
none

 

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Title: Marine birds and aquaculture in British Columbia. Assessment and Management of interactions.

Year: 1989

Author(s): Jaqueline Booth; Harriet Rueggenberg

Type: Government document

Description:
This report documents the results of Phase II of a project aimed at assessing the effects of BC's growing aquaculture industry on its marine bird populations. In this phase, the extent of geographical overlap between areas of current and potential aquaculture development and areas used by marine birds was examined, indicating the bird species, types of aquaculture and areas of the coast involved.The project is comprised of three phases. Phase I reviewed the relevant literature, describing the nature of interactions that can occur between marine birds and the various types of aquaculture, and providing an analytical framework for the subsequent phases (Booth and Rueggeberg, 1988). In Phase II, a computer database and geographical informations system is developed to examine the overlap between areas of current and potential aquaculture development and areas of marine bird habitat. Phase III consists of two studies that examine on-site interactions between birds and aquaculture, one dealing with salmon farming and the other with mussel farming (Rueggeberg and Booth, 1989.

 

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Title: Marine birds and aquaculture in British Columbia: Assessment and Management of Interactions

Year: 1989

Author(s): H. Rueggenberg; J. Booth

Type: Government document

Description:
This report documents the results of Phase III of a project aimed at assessing the effects of BC's growing aquaculture industry on its marine bird populations. The project is comprised of three phases. Phase I reviewed the relevant literature, describing the nature of interactions that can occur between marine birds and the various types of aquaculture, and providing an analytical framework for the subsequent phases (Booth and Rueggeberg, 1988). In Phase II, a computer database and geographical informations system is developed to examine the overlap between areas of current and potential aquaculture development and areas of marine bird habitat. Phase III consists of two studies that examine on-site interactions between birds and aquaculture, one dealing with salmon farming (Rueggeberg and Booth, 1989) and the other with mussel farming (this report).

 

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Title: Game guide can't bear the heat in Tofino

Year: 1989

Author(s): Larry Pynn

Type: Newspaper Article

Description:
(None)

 

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Title: Tribal council plans action to protect clam resource

Year: 1989

Author(s): Carla Wilson

Type: Newspaper Article

Description:
(None)

 

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Title: Occurrence of Cancer crab (C. magister and C. oregonensis) megalopae off the west coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia.

Year: 1988

Author(s): Glen S. Jamieson; Antan C. Phillips

Type: Journal Article

Description:
The seasonal and cross-shelf occurrences of Cancer crab (C magister and C. oregonensis) megalopae in 1985 along a transect line perpendicular to the coast off Tofino, BC, are presented. Megalopae of both species were generally absent from surface waters during daylight hours. The two species may have slight temporal differences in nocturnal surface abundance, with C. magister occuring later in the evening and earlier in the morning than C. oregonensis. Their relative occurrence at the surface during the night was used to calibrate cross-shelf megalopal abundance data. Cross-shelf megalopal intermolt stage proportions were calculated, relating degree of megalopal development to proximity of nearshore habitat required for successful settlement of larvae. Cancer magister megalopae were present from April to August, with peak abundance in May and June. Megalope were abundant in a broad band 37-148 km from shore, with peak abundance 56 km offshore in June. In May, some late stage megalope were collected in coastal inlets but settlement appeared low in coastal study areas. Megalopal abundance decreased abruptly shoreward of 28 km from the coast. Cancer oregonensis megalopae were also present from April to August, with their pattern of cross-shelf abundance basically smilar to that of C. magister. However, in contrast to C. magister, abundance of late stage megalopae in coastal inlets was relatively high in June, indicating that a significant settlement of megalopae of this species could have occurred. Evidence for cross-shelf movement of Cancer megalope is discussed.

 

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Title: An Experimental Transplant of Northern Abalone, Haliotis kamtschatkana, in Barkley Sound, British Columbia

Year: 1988

Author(s): B. Emmett; G. S. Jamieson

Type: Journal Article

Description:
The biological and economic feasibilities of transplanting northern abalone, Haliotis kamtschatkana, from exposed beds to two sites in sheltered, productive abalone habitat were investigated. After nine months, 39% and 72% of transplanted abalone were recovered at the two replicate sites. Recovery of tagged abalone at a control site, situated in the exposed source area, was 32%. Growth in shell length of transplanted abalone over the nine months averaged 7.8% whereas the average growth of non-transplanted controls was 3.7%, significantly less. There was little emigration of abalone from the transplant sites. The study concludes that it is feasible to transplant 50-100 mm H. kamtschatkana in order to enhance growth. The economic feasibility of transplants is dependent on site-specific recovery rates and the costs of harvesting seed abalone. The population dynamics of abalone in exposed beds and the long-term potential for enhancing abalone settlement by introducing broodstock to deplete areas are two aspects which now require investigation.

 

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Title: Sandpiper Survey of the Tofino Mudflats

Year: 1988

Author(s): Mark Hobson

Type: Report (unpublished)

Description:
Introduction: The tidal mudflats near Tofino between the Esowista Peninsula and Meares Island are used by migrating shorebird during spring and fall migrations and as an over-wintering site for waterfowl. Surveys of the winter waterfowl have been conducted by the B. C. Fish and Wildlife Branch in 1972 and 1983, and in 1986 a survey of the shorebird populations utilizing the mudflats through the summer months was sponsored by B. C. Fish and Wildlife Branch and Ducks Unlimited. The purpose of this study was to gather data on the population size of Western Sandpipers (Calidris mauri) on Tofino mudflats during spring and summer of 1988.

 

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Title: Effects of intensive forest management on breeding birds of Vancouver Island. Problem Analysis.

Year: 1988

Author(s): K.L. Sadoway

Type: Government document

Description:
This publication is one of three companion publications resulting from a problem analysis on the effects of intensive forest management on non-ungulate wildlife of Vancouver Island. Non-ungulate species include all amphibian, reptile, bird, and mammal (excluding deer and elk) species that occur on Vancouver Island.

 

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Title: Vocal recognition between parents and young of ancient murrelets, Synthliboramphus antiguus (Aves: Alcidae

Year: 1987

Author(s): Ian Jones, University of Toronto; Bruce Falls; Anthony Gaston

Type: Journal Article

Description:
Vocalization is a conspicuous feature of the departure of family groups of ancient murrelets, Synthliboramphus antiguus, from their colonies. The nocturnal timing of departure and the temporary separation of adults and chicks, followed by their reunion among many conspecifics. suggest that they recognize one another by their vocalizations. In this study, the calls of adults showed greater between-than within-individual variability, indicating their potential for use in recognition. The calls of sibling chicks were similar and chick calls showed greater variability between broods than within broods. In a playback experiment in a water-filled arena, chicks given the choice of parent's and non-parent's calls preferentially approached the parent's calls and responded to them vocally. In two trials, playback of chick calls in a cove containing many adults seeking chicks attracted the correct parents. It is likely that both parents and chicks recognize each other's calls and that this ability is based on their experience with the calls prior to departure. The chicks hear their parent's calls each time a parent returns to the burrow to relieve its mate. Parents hear the calls of their two chicks after they hatch, a few days before departure. A system of mutual recognition may be fundamental for the success of the colony/departure strategy of ancient murrelets.

 

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Title: Time budget and parental behavior of breeding American Black Oystercathchers in British Columbia

Year: 1987

Author(s): M.A. Purdy; E.H> Miller

Type: Journal Article

Description:
From the results section: "In this section, behavioral differences between the sexes at each stage of breeding and changes in their behavior over the breeding season are considered."

 

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Title: Applying 15 Years of Carnation Creek Results

Year: 1987

Type: Report (unpublished)

Description:
none