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Your search for Animal species returned 330 records. Showing Records 276 to 305. Please Select a Record to View.

 

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Title: Report on summer research, 1979 and Proposed Research and Budget for 1977 on Cleland Island Ecological Reserve

Year: 1977

Author(s): S. Groves

Type: Miscellaneous Notes

Description:
none

 

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Title: Some observations on foraging by Black Oystercatchers (Haematopus bachmani Audubon)

Year: 1977

Author(s): E. B. Hartwick

Type: Journal Article

Description:
Several aspects of the foraging of Black Oystercatchers are described in this study. Adults showed a tendency to bring similar prety to the young on successive occasions. Adults showed a variety of responses to potential prey. When presented with artificial arrays of limpets, adults showed definite responses to different sizes of limpets. The responses are discussed in relation to a current model of optimal foraging.

 

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Title: General biological aspects of Onuphis elegans, a sedentary polychaete found off Long Beach, British Columbia.

Year: 1977

Author(s): Peter B. Scales

Type: Student Paper

Description:
none

 

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Title: Cleland Island Ecological Reserve

Year: 1976

Author(s): R. George; D. Clark

Type: Paper

Description:
First paragraph: Cleland Island is the outermost island in Clayoquot Sound on the western shore of Vancouver Island. It has a land area of 19 acres with dimensions approximately 200 yards by 400 yards and a maximum elevation of approximately 60 feet. The island has been protected as a wildlife refuge for some years and was established as the first Ecological Reserve in British Columbia in May 1971. These actions were undertaken to protect the island in recognition of its importance as a seabird nesting and colony site. The island is the site of a number of continuing studies of indigenous seabirds.

 

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Title: The Coastal Mink on Vancouver Island, British Columbia

Year: 1976

Author(s): David Hatler, University of Alaska

Type: Academic Thesis

Description:
The mink (Mustela vison evagor) which frequents the Pacific coastal shores of Vancouver island, British Columbia, forages primarily in the marine intertidal zone, feeding mostly upon small crustaceans and fish. Decapod crabs of the family Cancridae are taken throughout the year, but especially in sumer when they move into intertidal waters to mate and moult. Kelp crabs (Pugettia) and most fish species appear to the be most vulnerable in winter, when storms create instability in their near-shore habitat. Water depth, substrate particle size, and the degree of protection from heavy wave action are among the most important factors influencing the success of mink hunting for these organisms. Along these food-rich shores, most mink hunted at success rates which would have provided their daily requirements in less than two hours of hunting activity. Nevertheless, observations of individuals which hunted with less than average success, under various conditions,indicate that accessibility to food varies with place and time, especially relative to tide level. ...

 

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Title: Northwest Bay Cougar Study: Progress Report

Year: 1975

Author(s): P. E. Dewar; P. L. Dewar

Type: Report (unpublished)

Description:
...In view of the widespread opinion that Vancouver Island has one of the highest concentration of cougars in North America, it was felt that it was the logical place for a study of the habits of the cougar. From the early 1900s to 1957, a bounty of $15 to $40 was put on the cougar in British Columbia. After the bounty was removed, some members of the public felt that the cougar population would increase drastically, particularly on Vancouver Island where large numbers of cougars had been taken. This feeling still prevails, especially when the occasional cougar is sighted around a settlement.

 

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Title: Oil Threat to Birds on the Canadian West Coast

Year: 1975

Author(s): Kees Vermeer; Rebecca Vermeer

Type: Journal Article

Description:
The potential effects of oil spills on aquatic birds and their feeding habitat on the Canadian west coast are assessed and the related literature on oil pollution is reviewed. Present shipping and transport of oil and increased tanker traffic along the entire British Columbia coast in 1977 constitute a threat to the destruction of birds from oil spillage. Concentrations of seabirds will be most vulnerable to spills. Three major colonies along the coast of British Columbia are the Langara Region, the southeast coast of the Queen Charlotte Islands, and the Scott Islands. Alcids and storm petrels are the most numerous seabirds along the British Columbia coast. Alcids are among the birds most vulnerable to oil pollution whereas storm petrels are less threatened by spills than alcids because they spend more time in the air and only dive occasionally. Waterfowl, especially diving ducks, will be vulnerable to spills during the winter as they concentrate in large numbers in estuaries and inlets along the British Columbia coast. The large wintering populations of ducks, geese, and grebes along the Fraser Delta foreshore and Boundary Bay will be endangered because of their nearness to tanker and shipping traffic. Approximately one million loons, shearwaters, phalaropes, ducks, gulls and geese migrate north in the spring along west Vancouver Island. These migrants, because of their concentration in large numbers, may be temporarily but critically vulnerable to oil pollution. The birds most likely to be directly affected by spills are breeding populations of alcids and wintering diving ducks, whereas ducks, geese, and shorebirds, which feed in the intertidal zone, may be hardest hit indirectly through destruction of their feeding habitat. Of the ducks threatened by destruction of their feeding habitat, seaducks are most vulnerable of all ducks as they rely most on the marine habitat for feeding purposes.

 

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Title: A New Common Murre Colony in British Columbia

Year: 1975

Author(s): R. Wayne Campbell; John G. Ward; Michael G. Shepard

Type: Journal Article

Description:
The early stages of the establishment of a new Common Murre colony on the central west coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia are documented. In 1969 at least four pairs of murres attempted nesting. The following year the number increased to six pairs, of which at least one fledged young. In subsequent years (to 1974), however, growth of the murre colony was retarded by a growing Glaucous-winged Gull population which eventually usurped habitat used by murres for nesting. One pair of murres nested (unsuccessfully) in 1974. Notes on success of nesting attempted, breeding cycle, and activity of non-breeding murres is presented. This colony is the third known for the province.

 

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Title: Summary of Activities and Achievements of the Northwest Bay Cougar Study During Spring and Summer of 1974

Year: 1974

Author(s): Percy Dewar; Penelope Dewar

Type: Report (unpublished)

Description:
From January to April, 1974, most of our time was spent hunting for cougars with hounds. During that time we fitted 2 male cougars with radio collars. Poor weather prevented us from hunting as often as was necessary to cover the study area efficiently. During the beginning of the year we did not have radio transmitters and 3 cougars were treed that could have been fitted with these if they had been available. During this time we had radio collars on male cougars only. Tracking these cougars closely from the ground proved impossible because they travelled extensively. Tracking from the air was prevented because of poor weather conditions and lack of funds for flying. Therefor we obtained very little information on the movements of these cougars.

 

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Title: Birds and Disturbed Forest Succession After Logging in Pacific Rim National Park, Vancouver Island, British Columbia and A Contribution Towards the Development of an Interpretive Plan for Logged Areas

Year: 1974

Author(s): Nicholas Anthony Roe

Type: Academic Thesis

Description:
The relationship between birds and forest succession after logging were studied during the summer season of 1972 in the Coastal Western Hemlock Zone of Krajina (1965) in Pacific Rim National Park on the west coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Birds were counted at eight sites representing five stages of forest succession along transects totalling 800 metres in length in each stage. The stages were as follows: (1) 2 years old - logged in 1970, not planted and supporting no tree growth (two transects of 400 m); (2) 8 years old - logged in 1964, burned and planted with Douglas fir, grand fir, and a few Sitka spruce, weith western hemlock and western red cedar also present (one 800 m transect); (3) 12 years old - logged in 1960, burned, and planted with Douglas fir, with western hemlock and western red cedar also present (two transects of 400 m); (4) 24 years old - logged in 1948, not planted but supporting growth of western hemlock, western red cedar and red alder (one 800 m transect); (5) mature forest with no history of logging, consisting of western hemlock, western red cedar and Pacific silver fir (two transects of 400 m). Transect counts of birds were supplemented by a spot-mapping method. The area surveyed was 0.8 ha per successional stage in both methods. Results from both methods were converted into biomass figures using standard weights of each species. Collected field data on each major vegetation species was analysed for each successional stage in order to assemble a description of the structure and compositon of the habitat. The separate stages and different types of forest succession contained bird populations that were different. Biomass of birds was greatest in the 24-year Unplanted Stage., and leas t in the Mature Forest Stage. Bird species diversity was greatest in the 8-year Planted Stage, and least in the 2-year Unplanted Stage. The 12-year Planted Stage has a low biomass and an intermediate species diversity of birds. Increases in biomass were highly positively correlated with increases in canopy coverage by red alder, and with increases in the number of ground cover species. Increases in bird species diversity were high positively correlated with increases in the number of tree species. These relationships suggest that monocultural plantations reduce the productivity (expressed in biomass) of birds in forest succession.

 

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Title: Breeding ecology of the black oystercatcher (Haematopus bachmani Audubon)

Year: 1974

Author(s): E. B. Hartwick

Type: Journal Article

Description:
Breeding behaviour and success of the black oystercatcher were followed during a study of foraging patterns of these birds on Cleland Island, British Columbia. Observations were made on nesting, copulation, and care of the young. Breeding success was relatively low, with losses occurring from predation and storms. This seems to be typical for the outer coast. Interactions with gulls played a large role in the behaviour and breeding success of the oystercatchers. Differences were noted between observations on Cleland and descriptions given in the literature.

 

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Title: A Preliminary Survey of Larval Fish, Zooplankton and Phytoplankton of Pacific Rim National Park

Year: 1974

Author(s): Daniel J. Faber, Canadian Oceanographic Identification Centre

Type: Report (unpublished)

Description:
none

 

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Title: An Analysis of Use by Waterfowl of Tideflats in Southern Clayoquot Sound, British Columbia.

Year: 1973

Author(s): David Halter, Canadian Wildlife Service

Type: Report (published)

Description:
Based on aerial census of waterfowl, provides an overview of abundance and distribution of waterfowl use of the mudflats.

 

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Title: Birds of Pacific Rim National Park British Columbia

Year: 1973

Author(s): David F. Hatler; R. Wayne Campbell; Adrian Dorst

Type: Report (unpublished)

Description:
None

 

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Title: Laysan Albatross, Scaled Petrel, Parakeet Auklet: Additions to the List of Canadian Birds

Year: 1973

Author(s): R. Wayne Campbell; Michael G. Shepard

Type: Journal Article

Description:
none

 

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Title: An Analysis of Use, by Waterfowl, of Tideflats in Southern Clayoquot Sound, British Columbia

Year: 1973

Author(s): David F. Hatler

Type: Report (unpublished)

Description:
Introduction: Pacific Rim National Park was established "to preserve the significant natural features of the Pacific coast and (to) provide opportunities for compatible recreational and interpretive activities." Among the significant natural features in this area are the large numbers of waterfowl which seasonally use the rich, shallow water inlets of southern Clayoquot Sound. The inclusion of the McLean Point-Grice Bay area within park boundaries was at least partly to provide sanctuary for these waterfowl. During the fall and early winter of 1972-73, as part of an avifaunal survey of Pacific Rim National Park, a study was carreid out in the above area. The objective was to: determine extent and manner of use by waterfowl of tide flats within the Park boundary and relate it to that of similar areas neighbouring the Park boundary.... The results of the work are presented here. It should be mentioned that though the general term "waterfowl" has been used in the foregoing paragraphs, it is really geese which have been the center of attention in this area. In past years when access was difficult, the dedicated waterfowlers who traveled to Tofino went for geese. Present day inlet reminiscences dwel on geese. Citizen concern for dwindling "waterfowl" populations has focussed on geese. And if I went out today and scared up a mixed flock of 1000 ducks and 50 geese, my consciousness would be riveted on the geese. Perhaps not all of us have the same reasons, but I think that in the final analysis, most of us are biased to geese. This report, which is largest about geese, is a response to (or perhaps a reflection of) that bias.

 

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Title: Native Swans Wintering on Vancouver Island over the Period 1969-71

Year: 1972

Author(s): Ian D. Smith; Donald A. Blood

Type: Journal Article

Description:
Counts of wintering native swans indicated that the Vancouver Island population increased by 129 per cent over the period 1969-71, and that the 1970-71 population contained a minimum of 1,076 birds. It is believed that most of the birds are Trumpeter Swans. Over the same period, the proportion of cygnets has been 22 per cent, 26 per cent and 25 per cent. Major wintering areas appear to be centered about sheltered salt-water estuaries. The proportion of birds wintering on these estuaries was highest during the most severe winter over the counting period.

 

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Title: Species mentioned in George Nicholson's Vancouver Island's West Coast 1762-1962

Year: 1971

Author(s): George Nicholson

Type: Miscellaneous Notes

Description:
Notes from George Nicholson's Vancouver Island's West Coast, 1762-1962. List of animal species and other natural history notes from this book.

 

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Title: A photoduplicate file for British Columbia vertebrate records.

Year: 1971

Author(s): R. Wayne Campbell; David Stirling

Type: Journal Article

Description:
During 1970, colour slides and black and white photographs were solicited from naturalists and scientists throughout British Columbia to document the occurrence of rare or previously unrecorded vertebrates in the Province. Forty-one contributors submitted 150 photographs, of which 11 documented additions to the known vertebrate fauna of British Columbia. A centre of deposition for photographic records of vertebrates in British Columbia has now been established and set up in the Vertebrate Museum at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver. Examples of photographs acceptable are listed under seven general headings.

 

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Title: Status of the Caspian Tern in British Columbia

Year: 1971

Author(s): R. Wayne Campbell, University of British Columbia

Type: Journal Article

Description:
Prior to the 1960s, records of Caspian terns (Hydroprogne caspia) in British Columbia were few. With the increased interest in birdwatching during the past decade and the establishment of a small breeding colony of these terns on the Washington coast in 1957, 68 records of this bird's occurrence in the Province have been gathered and are presented in this paper. All records, with pertinent information, are listed. Caspian terns can now be considered rare summer visitants to the southern coast of British Columbia and casual in summer in the south central Interior.

 

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Title: Preliminary Survey of the Intertidal and Subtidal Marine Fauna and Flora of Pacific Rim National Park with Emphasis on the Long Beach Section

Year: 1971

Author(s): Gordon Robilliard

Type: Report (unpublished)

Description:
Pacific Rim National Park (the "Park") on the central west coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia, is divisible into three geographically and topographically distinct units. A preliminary survey of the marine intertidal and subtidal biota suggests that each unit is more or less unique with respect to its species composition, abundance, and distribution. The intertidal-subtidal environment of each section of the Park is comprised of a complex association of communities characterized by the physical habitat as well as by the biological assemblages present in these habitats. Three parameters are used to characterize the physical habitat. First, an area is either intertidal or subtidal, depending on its vertical distance above or below the mean lower low water (MLLW) tide level. Second, the degree of exposure of an area to the full force of the large waves and surf is categorized as 1) exposed to full force of wave shock and surge; 2) semi-protected from full force but receiving some relatively heavy wave action 3) protected from wave activity other than wind chop. Third, substratum is categorized as mud, sand, gravel, cobble, boulder, or solid rock (or some combination thereof) depending largely on the size of the component particles. Each habitat has a characteristic faunal assemblage (=biological community) associated with it. The species composition and abundance as well as some of the ecological interactions are described for each faunal assemblage with special emphasis on the exposed and semi-protected rocky intertidal habitats. A fairly detailed survey of these latter habitats reveals a distinct, visible vertical zonation pattern with four zones being recognized on the basis of vertical distance above MLLW and five zones on the basis of the vertical distribution of the dominant space-occupying or predatory species. Directly or indirectly (and often unknowingly), people exploit the marine organisms of the Park by collecting them for food, curios or curiosity, by driving their cars on the beach, or by walking on the animals especially on rocky shores. Most of the activity, restricted to the intertidal zone of Long Beach near the campsite area, has not had a marked effect on the biological community. However, as the influx of tourists increases, the level of exploitive activities will rise and may affect significant changes in the structure of the biological community. However, as the influx of tourists increases, the level of expoloitive activities will rise and may affect significant changes in the structure of the biological communities. Several species of mollusc, echinoderms, and crabs found in the Park are considered gourmet delights by many people, and thus could be over-exploited either by a sports fishery or a commercial enterprise. The preliminary nature of the survey is emphasized. A number of questions regarding: 1) the systematic, distribution, life history and ecology of many important species; and 2) the structure, stability, and dynamics of the biological communities, are posed with the suggestion that these questions be investigated before public utilization of the Park brings about significant changes.

 

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Title: The Sabine's Gull in Southwestern British Columbia

Year: 1970

Author(s): R. Wayne Campbell

Type: Journal Article

Description:
Records of the Sabine's Gull, Xema sabini, in south-western British Columbia have been gathered from various sources for the period 1963 through 1969. In fall migration the gull is a rare transient in the Victoria area and farther inland, at Vancouver, a casual transient. Only occasionally is the bird a winter visitant to Victoria. Brief comments on foods and plumage are given.

 

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Title: Observations on the distribution and migration of some seabirds off the outer coasts of British Columbia and Washington State, 1946-1949

Year: 1969

Author(s): P. W. Martin; M. T. Myres

Type: Journal Article

Description:
This paper puts on record a series of observations of seabirds made by Patrick W. Martin off the outer coast of British Columbia while fishing during the years 1946-1949. Because of the fact that they extend over four seasons, the observations not only provide previously unavailable information on the regional and seasonal distribution of pelagic seabirds within 100 miles of the Pacific Coast of Canada, but also indicate the period of migratory passage of several species of seabirds along the outer coast of British Columbia.

 

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Title: Notes of the Natural history of Cleland Island,British Columbia, with Ephasis on the Breeding Bird Fauna

Year: 1968

Author(s): wayne campbell; david stirling

Type: Report (unpublished)

Description:
"Cleland Island also called Bare Island, lies in Clayoquot Sound, off the west coast of central Vancouver Island approximately 8 miles north-east of the Village of Tofino.

 

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Title: Notes on the Natural History of Cleland Island, British Columbia, with Emphasis on the Breeding Bird Fauna

Year: 1967

Author(s): R. Wayne Campbell; David Stirling

Type: Paper

Description:
none