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Your search for Animal species returned 330 records. Showing Records 76 to 105. Please Select a Record to View.

 

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Title: Tsu-xiit speaks with pod

Year: 2005

Author(s): David Wiwchar, Ha-Shilth-Sa

Type: Newspaper Article

Description:
Gold River - Spending the winter feeding on Chinook and other fish species around Nootka Sound, Tsu-xiit (Luna, L-98) communicated briefly with passing members of G-pod last month. According to independent whale researcher Lisa Larsson, the communication was brief, but significant as it showed Tsu-xiit can still communicate with resident populations...

 

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Title: Rockfish stocks slow to grow, conservation areas proposed.

Year: 2005

Author(s): Jennifer Dart, The Westerly Newspaper

Type: Newspaper Article

Description:
Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) announced last month the final deadline for public input into its proposed Rockfish Conservation Areas (RCA) plan would be March 11.

 

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Title: Rockfish areas debated.

Year: 2005

Author(s): Jennifer Dart, The Westerly Newspaper

Type: Newspaper Article

Description:
The Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) has announced its final Rockfish Conservation Areas (RCAs) which took effect June 1. A total of 16 new protected areas were announced for coastal BC, bringing the total number of RCAs up to 102 (not 104, a number erroneously released by DFO previously).

 

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Title: Nearshore oceanography and planktonic prey (family Porcellanidae) of gray whales, Eschrichtius robustus, in Clayoquot Sound, British Columbia.

Year: 2005

Author(s): Kecia Alene Kerr

Type: Academic Thesis

Description:
Gray whales in Clayoquot Sound occasionally feed on dense patches of porcelain crab larvae. The irregular timing and extent of patches prompted interest in factors influencing larval distribution and abundance. M.Sc. Thesis, University of Victoria

 

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Title: Abalone poaching brings $35,000 fine

Year: 2005

Author(s): The Westerly News

Type: Newspaper Article

Description:
A resident of Ahousat received a fine of $35,000 after pleading guilty in Ucluelet Provincial Court to one count of unlawful possession of abalone .....

 

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Title: DFO puts abalone project at risk

Year: 2005

Author(s): David Wiwchar, Ha-Shilth-Sa

Type: Newspaper Article

Description:
Bamfield - A five-year project to rehabilitate local abalone stocks is in jeapordy because of legal interpretation of the Species at Risk Act (SARA) by Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO). The Bamfield Huu-ay-aht Community Abalone Project started in 1999 with the goal of rehabilitating local stocks of Pinto Abalone, wiped out by years of over-harvesting and poaching....

 

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Title: 'Leave Luna Alone' Scientific Panel said

Year: 2005

Author(s): David Wiwchar, Ha-Shilth-Sa

Type: Newspaper Article

Description:
As Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) and Vancouver Aquarium staff prepared to capture Tsu'xiit in Nootka Sound in 2003, documents obtained by Ha-Shilth-Sa reveal many within the department were already worried about outcomes. While many within Fisheries and Oceans Canada and their Scientific Panel were deeply committed to the reunification plan, documents obtained under the federal Access to Information Program show others within the department and panel were concerned the plan was ill-fated, and Tsu'xiit destined for captivity....

 

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Title: MMFN announces new guardianship for Tsu'xiit

Year: 2005

Author(s): David Wiwchar, Ha-Shilth-Sa

Type: Newspaper Article

Description:
Tsu'xiit (Luna, L-98) the solitary orca of Nootka Sound, will be guarded full-time by the Mowachaht/Muchalaht First Nation starting immediately, the First Nation announced this week. The announcement came shortly after the band received several days of advice and counsel on stewardship from whale and dolphin experts from both Canada and the United States...

 

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Title: National park undertakes wolf and cougar studies

Year: 2005

Author(s): Jennifer Dart, The Westerly News

Type: Newspaper Article

Description:
Intensive field studies on wolves and cougars are getting underway this summer in Pacific Rim National Park Reserve (PRNPR). Park warden Bob Hansen is leading the studies into these local carnivores to come to a better basic understanding about their habitat needs and how increased visitation to the parks and general growth in the area is affecting them. Hansen has already completed two years of groundwork leading up to the projects that will be carried out by University of Victoria masters student Danielle Thompson, University of British Columbia PhD student Simone Runyan, and University of Northern British Columbia field assistant Todd Windle. The students are being funded with the help of Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) grants, the PRNPR and the Clayoquot Biosphere Trust...

 

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Title: Injured harbour seal rescue a group effort

Year: 2005

Author(s): Jennifer Dart, The Westerly News

Type: Newspaper Article

Description:
Several locals helped rescue an injured harbour seal at Cox Bay Dec. 5. Sheri Williams of Tofino heard about the seal in the afternoon, but got frustrated when no one seemed to be able to help. "When I found out about the seal, I called several people who all referred me to other people," said Wiliams. "I found it very frustrating that no one seemed to know what to do." Injured mammals do not fall within the jurisdiction of Fisheries and Oceans and the area is outside of Pacific Rim National Park Reserve....

 

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Title: Sea lion food habits shifting

Year: 2005

Author(s): Lisa Stewart, The Westerlyl News

Type: Newspaper Article

Description:
The Barkley Sound area population of California sea lions (the dark brown ones that bark) is at an historical high and the animals in the Ucluelet harbour are "fat harbour junkies" according to one local marine mammal biologist. Wendy Staniszlo says the average California sea lion weighs about 800 lbs. and the animals in the harbour are even heavier - a testament to their intelligence and ability to find plenty of food. But it's the source of that food that has Staniszlo and others worried....

 

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Title: Carnivore-Visitor Use Patterns within the Long Beach Unit of Pacific Rim National Park Reserve on the West Coast of Vancouver Island

Year: 2005

Author(s): Danielle Edwards

Type: Report (unpublished)

Description:
There has been a noted increase in wolf-human and cougar-human encounters in the Pacific Rim National Park Reserve and adjacent areas in recent years. This has included increased wolf activity within the Long Beach and Broken Group Islands sections of the park and adjacent areas. Cougar activity has been sporadic with activity peaks occurring when one or more animals are frequenting an area. The question that this presents is what is causing this increase? The larger PRNPR carnivore project is seeking to answer these questions through a number of projects. The purpose of this section of the project is to update the wildlife and visitor databases, document the data and look for correlations between wildlife encounters and visitor numbers. The number of visitors to the West Coast Trail and Broken Group Islands unit of the parks has been relatively stable over the last 10 years. The number of visitors passing through the Long Beach Unit has seen a steady increase in traffic, with most traffic during July and August each year and annual visitation peaking at over 750,000 visitors to the Long Beach Unit in 2003. Activity in Barkley and Clayoquot Sounds outside of the park units has not been consistently documented. Visitors who travel to the region by boat are largely unrecorded with no recent data on boat traffic available. Based on the recorded wildlife observations in the region and visitor data, both the number of wolf and cougar observations and encounters have been increasing as have the number of visitors. Whether or not there is a causative relationship can not be determined with the available data. The increased number of visitors coupled with improved wildlife encounter recording likely accounts for some of the observed correlation. Aggressive wolf activity is known to have increased in recent years separate from improvements in reporting and visitor numbers and can be strongly tied to feeding and intentional habituation of wolves both within and outside of the park.

 

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Title: Social Science Annotated Bibliography on Human-Carnivore Interactions

Year: 2005

Author(s): C├ęcile Lacombe

Type: Report (unpublished)

Description:
This annotated bibliography provides a summary of international and North American research and other literature deemed relevant to wolf and cougar management in Pacific Rim National Park Reserve, with particular reference to the human side of human-wolf and human-cougar interactions. Where pertinent, examples from research concerned with other wild animals were included. This annotated bibliography has the objective of acquiring a good knowledge of human-carnivore encounters, understanding factors that lead to negative encounters, and identifying management communication strategies that might be useful for addressing the problem.

 

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Title: Visitor Behaviour and Perception of Bears, Wolves and Cougars at Pacific Rim National Park

Year: 2005

Author(s): Sasha Wade, University of Victoria (B.Sc. Honours Project)

Type: Student Paper

Description:
This study's objective was to determine whether conflict-related behavior of visitors in Pacific Rim National Park Reserve (PRNPR) towards bears, cougars and wolves could be predicted by their perceived risk, emotional attribution about the animal, perceived knowledge, or overall true animal knowledge. An additional aim was to test the Simplified Conjoint Expected Risk model, which explains differences in perceived risk. Surveys were administered to 179 PRNPR visitors. Perceived knowledge, perceived risk and emotional attribution towards the animal were significant predictors of conflict-related behavior. Subjective probability of harm significantly predicted perceived risk. These results have implications for renewed park management strategies and programs that target the behaviour of visitors to PRNPR.

 

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Title: Residents' Attributions, Attitudes, and Support for Human-Wildlife Conflict Management

Year: 2005

Author(s): Christine L. Jackson, University of Victoria (B.Sc. Honours Project)

Type: Student Paper

Description:
This study aimed to gain knowledge about human-wildlife conflicts, with the ultimate goal of assisting in the effective management of these interactions. Its immediate purpose was to investigate, with respect to bears, cougars, and wolves, the values, attitudes, knowledge, and past experiences of residents who live near the Long Beach Unit of Pacific Rim National Park Reserve (PRNPR). It examined how residents' experiences and attitudes affect the attributions they make about the causes of their interactions. It also examined how environmental attitudes and knowledge about current management strategies predict residents' support for various solutions...

 

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Title: Wild Wolves? Understanding human-wolf interactions in the Broken Group Islands of Pacific Rim National Park Reserve

Year: 2005

Author(s): Jen Smith, Lakehead University

Type: Other

Description:
As part of a broader initiative to explore both the human dimensions of human-wildlife interactions and the biology of cougar, bear and wolf populations and behaviours in and around Pacific Rim National Park Reserve, my research uses social science to explore kayakers' attitudes toward wolves and what wolves mean to them while visiting the BGI.

 

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Title: Tofino Mudflats Wildlife Management Area: Shoreline Survey, May-June 2005

Year: 2005

Author(s): Barbara Beasley; Caron Olive

Type: Report (unpublished)

Description:
The Tofino Mudflats Wildlife Management Area (WMA), located near the village of Tofino on the west coast of Vancouver Island, is approximately 1770 hectares of tidal flats and 338 hectares of terrestrial lands. It is considered one of the ten most critical wetland areas for migratory birds in western Canada. Stewardship of the WMA involves minimizing the effects of adjacent development. In 2005, we initiated a baseline survey of 2322 m of shoreline where housing development has the highest potential to alter terrestrial and marine habitats over the next decade. We combined photo-point monitoring with field surveys along transects to document how much linear shoreline was occupied by different vegetation types, including invasive exotic plants. We also recorded the presence of buildings, other human structures, potential perch trees, large woody debris, fallen trees and streams. Coniferous trees dominated the shoreline and marsh vegetation occurred over most of the high intertidal area. Buildings were present along approximately 710m of shoreline. The exotic invasive species (Scotch broom (Cytisus scoparius), and another invasive, vetch (not identified to speceis), were found close to buildings. The photos, survey data and maps were summarized and compiled on the West Coast Vancouver Island Web Atlas in the hope that they will support informed decision-making, assist with the generation of educational material, and increase awareness of shoreline development along sensitive habitats.

 

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Title: Diet of Carnivores in Pacific Rim National Park of Canada: Final Report

Year: 2005

Author(s): Song Horng Neo

Type: Report (unpublished)

Description:
Pacific Rim National Park Reserve of Canada has an interest in learning more about the ecology of wolves and cougars in the region. In recent years, there has been an increase in carnivore-human interaction. The park has concerns regarding carnivore conservation while at the same time wanting to ensure public safety. A key knowledge gap is the lack of local carnivore ecological information. Scat analysis provides the opportunity to learn more about the diet composition of carnivores living within the region. In this analysis, 93 large carnivore scats were analysed, with a focus on mammalian guard hair content.

 

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Title: Diet Analysis: Carnivore Scat from the WildCoast

Year: 2005

Author(s): Song Horng Neo, University of Victoria

Type: Other

Description:
Outline : (1) Introduction; (2) Scat processing methodology; (3) Results by species (wolves, cougar); (4) Results by location; (5) Conclusion

 

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Title: Preliminary Spatial Analysis: Mammal Sign on the WildCoast

Year: 2005

Author(s): Simone Runyan, UBC, Summit Environmental

Type: Other

Description:
(1) Do large mammals in the study area preferentially select certain: Slopes? Aspects? (2) Spatial Correlation: Is wolf sign randomly distributed with respect to sign of other mammals?

 

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Title: PRNPR Carnivore/Visitor Data Project

Year: 2005

Author(s): Parks Canada

Type: Other

Description:
- Park Units, Subunits and adjacent - Visitation to the park - Carnivore Tracking - Future Data Opportunities

 

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Title: Sea otters ravage shellfish in Clayoquot Sound.

Year: 2004

Author(s): Denise August, Ha-shilth-sa Newspaper

Type: Newspaper Article

Description:
Sea otters, once abundant throughout the Pacific Rim, are making a comeback thanks to the meddling of humans. The sea otter was wiped out on BC shores by the early 1900's due to the commercial fur trade.

 

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Title: Spatial variation in intertidal food web structures, Barkley Sound, British Columbia: Comparion using bulk and compound-specific isotope analysis.

Year: 2004

Author(s): Heather Patricia McNally

Type: Academic Thesis

Description:
This thesis examines spatial variation in food web structure and trophic position of four intertidal invertebrates, 'Mytilus californianus' (California mussel), 'Katharina tunicata' (black katy chiton), 'Anthopleura elegantissima' (aggregate green anemone) and ' Pisaster ochraceus' (ochre seastar) in Barkley Sound, British Columbia. M.Sc. Thesis, Queen's University

 

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Title: Ahousaht battles DFO over clam opening

Year: 2004

Author(s): Denise August, Ha-Shilth-Sa

Type: Newspaper Article

Description:
Ahousaht-This past December, with the holiday season fast approaching and families struggling to make ends meet, Ahousaht Ha'wiih decided to allow their members to dig White Pine beach for one tide only to alleviate hard economic times. ....

 

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Title: Bacterial infection in sea lions confirmed

Year: 2004

Type: Other

Description:
Sick sea lions have recently been observed on a number of local West Coast beaches. The public is being urged to use caution when they encounter these animals, after a sea lion carcass was found in Ucluelet tested postive for leptospirosis. Leptospirosis is a contagious bacterial disease that infect animals and humans....