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Your search for Ecological processes returned 67 records. Showing Records 51 to 67 . Please Select a Record to View.

 

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Title: Seasonal abundance and biomass of birds in eelgrass habitats in Browning Passage on the west coast of Vancouver Island.

Year: 1991

Author(s): Rob Butler, Canadian Wildlife Service; Adrian Dorst; Mark Hobson

Type: Proceedings

Description:
abstract: The Western Sandpiper Calidris mauri was the most abundant bird species seen in Browning Passage over a one year period and was most plentiful in April and August. Shorebirds as a group made up less than 2 percent of the annual bird biomass. Geese, diving ducks, and dabbling ducks made up nearly 34 percent of all birds seen through the year and nearly 80 percent of the bird biomass. They were least abundant in summer. pp109-113.

 

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Title: Summer distribution and abundance of Marbled Murrelets on the west and east coasts of Vancouver Island.

Year: 1991

Author(s): Jean-Pierre Savard; Moira Lemon

Type: Proceedings

Description:
abstract: We surveyed Marbled Murrelets Brachyramphus marmoratus along 576km of transects on the west coast of Vancouver Island and along 590km of transects on the east coast in May, June and July 1991.The distribution of Marbled Murrelets was clumped in all surveyed areas. pp.114-118.

 

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Title: Factors affecting colony attendance by Ancient Murrelets (Synthliboramphus antiquus)

Year: 1990

Author(s): Ian Jones, University of Toronto; Anthony Gaston; Bruce Falls

Type: Journal Article

Description:
We studied factors influencing variation in nightly levels of activity (birds arriving and vocalizing) and numbers of birds staging offshore at a colony of Ancient Murrelets at Reef Island, British Columbia, during 1984, 1985, and 1986. Activity was restricted to the hours of darkness and extremely variable in magnitude from night to night. The rate of entry into burrows tended to decease, and the amount of vocalization and numbers of birds at the staging area increased during the nesting season. We detected an underlying 4-day cyclical pattern of attendance. Nightly variability of activity at the colony was effected by moonlight and weather conditions. Since activity, particularly vocalization, was reduced on moonlight nights, we suggest that nocturnal colony attendance is a strategy to avoid diurnal predators in this species. The largest numbers of birds were present and vocalizing at the colony on calm moonless nights. Weather conditions explained a substantial proportion of the night to night variability in murrelt activity. Among weather variables, wind speed had the most consistent effect and was particularly important in 1985. Both short/term, i.e., of a particular night, and long-term, i.e., over the previous 3 days, conditions influenced activity. Our observations suggest that direct weather effects at the colony may be more important than weather effects related to foraging conditions. Interyear differences in activity may have resulted from the interaction of weather and general foraging conditions.

 

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Title: Functional Relationships between salal understory and forest overstory

Year: 1986

Author(s): D.J. Vales

Type: Academic Thesis

Description:
Abundance of salal (Gaultheria shallon Pursh) and its relationship to forest overstory were studied in immature forest stands on Vancouver Island having some topographical characteristics of deer winter ranges. Plots sampled over a range of stocking levels indicated that salal density was strongly related to single forest stand characteristics (r= 0.92-0.94) but predictive equations differed between plant associations. Most equations predicting salal biomass or cover did not differ between plant associations. Most equations predicting salal biomass or cover did not differ between plant associations. Equations calculated from data from single stands accounted for more of the variation in salal abundance (r= 0.73-0.97) than equations developed from data from several stands (r= 0.39-0.92). Mean salal shoot height was greatest under overstory cover of 65 to 80%.

 

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Title: At-sea biology of the Marbled Murrelet (Brachyramphus marmoratus) in Barkley Sound, British Columbia.

Year: 1985

Type: Academic Thesis

Description:
M.Sc Thesis, University of Manitoba, Department of Zoology.

 

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Title: The Ecology of Natural Disturbance and Patch Dynamics

Year: 1985

Type: Book

Description:
"Ecologists have always been aware of the importance of natural dynamics in ecosystems, but historically, the focus has been on successional development of equilibrium communities. While this approach has generated appreciable understanding of the composition and functioning of ecosystems, recently many workers have turned their attention to processes of disturbance themselves and to the evolutionary significance of such events. This shifted emphasis has inspired studies in diverse systems. We use the phrase "patch dynamics: to describe their common focus."

 

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Title: Deer movements and habitat use during winter

Year: 1985

Author(s): J.B. Nyberg; D. Doyle; L. Peterson

Type: Government document

Description:
The research topic identified as having the highest priority was how forestry practices could be used to create suitable black-tailed deer and Roosevelt elk winter habitat in young-growth stands. This working plan provided details of the research to be conducted on deer winter habitat during the winter of 1984/85.

 

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Title: Interactions between black-tailed deer and intensive forest management

Year: 1985

Author(s): R.S. McNay; R. Davies

Type: Government document

Description:
This problem analysis was requested by the Technical Working Group (TWG) directing the Integrated Wildlife-Intensive Forestry Research (IWIFR) program on Vancouver Island. It deals specifically with the ways that intensive forestry treatments modify the manner in which Columbian black-tailed deer select, use, and respond to various habitats. The objectives are: to define the problems associated with interactions between deer and intensive forestry; to review present knowledge about the problem and to identify information gaps related to it; to identify research topics; to suggest priorities for research; and to recommend approaches to high priority topics.

 

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Title: Cleland Island

Year: 1985

Author(s): Martin Ross

Type: Magazine article

Description:
none

 

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Title: Female size and nest depth in coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch)

Year: 1984

Author(s): Eric P. Van der Berghe; Mart R. Gross

Type: Journal Article

Description:
Nest depth was strongly correlated with female size in coho salmon. Since nests of different-sized females are at different depths, they are differently vulnerable to destruction by floods and to other females competing for the same nest sites.

 

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Title: Timing of Herring Spawnings in British Columbia, 1942-1979

Year: 1980

Author(s): A. S. Hourston

Type: Journal Article

Description:
The date of first and last spawnings and the dates when spawning was 10, 25, 50, 75, and 90% completed are tabulated, along with the duration of spawning and the abundance of egg deposition for 110 management units on the BC coast for each year since 1942 that data are available.

 

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Title: Biogeoclimatic Units of Central and Southern Vancouver Island

Year: 1979

Author(s): K Klinka; F. C. Nuszdorfer; L. Skoda

Type: Report (published)

Description:
"Ecosystem classification at the biogeoclimatic level has been refined further in that a new category, the biogeoclimatic variant, is described. Also, the ecological significance of biogeoclimatic units is substantiated by statistical treatment of climatic data. It is repeatedly shown by the analysis that the zonal ecosystems are reliable predictors of regional climate. A comparison of the annual actual evapotranspiration of biogeoclimatic unites, suggested as an index of plant activity, is carried out. The most characteristic features of each biogeoclimatic zone, subzone, and variat are described with the aid of photographs. The distribution of these units on central and southern Vancouver Island is shown on a map produced at the scale of 1:500,000."

 

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Title: Assessment of 1979 Herring Spawnings in the Meares Island Section of Clayoquot Sound, British Columbia

Year: 1979

Author(s): C.W. Haegele; D.C. Miller

Type: Report (published)

Description:
In the Meares Island section of Clayoquot SOund, herring spawn mainly on extensive beds of eelgrass. A diver survey of herring spawnings was conducted in 1979 to obtain the best possible estimate of egg deposition because estimates obtained from surface surveys seemed unrealistic. The survey showed that 3.7859 x 10(raised to the)12 eggs were deposited on 4.0028 x 10(raised to the)6 meters squared area. The large Elbow Bank had 50% of this spawn on 35% of the area. Sea grasses occupied 94% of the spawn area. Most of the spawn area was subtidal.

 

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Title: Aspects of the behaviour and ecology of Vancouver Island gray whales (Eschrichtius glaucus Cope).

Year: 1977

Author(s): James D. Darling

Type: Academic Thesis

Description:
intensive study of migrating and resident gray whales in the Pacific Rim National Park and Clayoquot Sound regions

 

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Title: An Analysis of Use by Waterfowl of Tideflats in Southern Clayoquot Sound, British Columbia.

Year: 1973

Author(s): David Halter, Canadian Wildlife Service

Type: Report (published)

Description:
Based on aerial census of waterfowl, provides an overview of abundance and distribution of waterfowl use of the mudflats.

 

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Title: Flora and Vegetation of Pacific Rim National Park: Phase 1, Long Beach

Year: 1972

Author(s): Marcus A. M. Bell

Type: Report (unpublished)

Description:
Three hundred and thirty eight vascular plant species comprising 198 genera and 69 families occur in the park, including 67 introductions. One hundred and twenty-six species are abundant and wide-spread, 185 rare to sparsely distributed, and 27 very rare within the park, including Habenaria chorisiana, Mecodium wrightii, and Crepis Nicaeensis. Bryophytes comprise a large part of the vegetation. A partial list of 147 mosses, 57 hepatics and 24 lichens is provided. All vascular plants are annotated for distribution and habitats within the park, flowering period, and other features as appropriate. Species are further related to the plant communities in which they occur, in order to maximize information on species ecology. Fourtenn major plant communities are defined on the basis of dominant vegetation and land form, and two on the basis of history of disturbance. Thirty nine tentative subcommities are briefly described. The five forested communities are dominated by one or more of sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis), western red cedar (Thuja plicata), western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla), lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta), amabilis fir (Abies amabilis), and Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii). Two non-forested communities are on logged or other disturbed areas characterized by species which reflect more the history of disturbance and land use than natural site conditions. Seven non-forested communities are respectivly dominated by Sphagnum spp., yellow pond lily (Nupha polysepalum), woolly cinquefoiil (Potentilla villosa), beach ryegrass (Elymus mollis), mace-headed sedge (Carex macrocephala), tufted hairgrass (Deschampsia cespitosa), and eelgrass (Zostera marina). A summary chart for differentiating community types is provided, based on species composition and environmental features. The main environmental factors influencing vegtation pattern is undisturbed areas appear to be parent material, soil moisture conditions, and oceanic influences. Four representative soil types are discussed and related to community distribution. Podzolization and gleization are dominant soil processes in this area.

 

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Title: Plant Associations and Succession in the Vegetation of The Sand Dunes of Long Beach, Vancouver Island

Year: 1963

Author(s): Richard Tatsuo Kuramoto

Type: Academic Thesis

Description:
The vegetation of the sand dunes of Long Beach, Vancouver Island, was studied on 116 sample plots. The purpose of this study was to describe the floristic and edaphic characteristics of the plant associations, to determine the major environmental factors controlling the distribution of the plant communities and to study the successional trends of the vegetation. The vegetation was described using the analytical and synthetical methods of the Zurich-Montpellier school of phytosociology. This thesis describes seven plant associations and four variants. The vegetation units are as follows: A. Foreshore habitats 1. Cakiletum edentulae, B. Blowout habitats 2. Poetum macranthae a. poosum macranthae b. abroniosum latifoliae, 3. Arctostaphyleto-Rhacomitrietum canescentis C. Habitats of the mobile dune ridge 4. Elymetum vancouverensis a. ammophilosum arenariae b. elymosum vancouverensis D. Habitats of the dune slack and stable dune ridge 5. Aireto-Ceratodontetum purpurei 6. Arctostaphyleto-Eurhynchietum oregani 7. Hetergenous communities in moist dune slack habitats E. The dune forest habitat 8. Piceeto-Gaultherieto-Maianthemetum dialatati Important environmental factors which control the distribution of these associations are the level of winter and storm tides, wind, the amount of sand burial and blowout that occurs in the habitat and the amount of available soil water. The first stages of succession begins in the unstable habitats of the Elymetum vancouverensis and Poetum macranthae. With stabilization of the habitat, these associations are suceeded by the Aireto-Ceratodontetum purpurei and the Arctostaphyletum-Eurhynchietum oregani in exposed habitats and the Arctostaphyleto-Rhacomitrietum canescentis in habitats well protected from wind. All vegetation eventually reaches the climax Piceeto-Gaultherieto-Maianthemetum dilatati.