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Your search for Habitat returned 322 records. Showing Records 201 to 230. Please Select a Record to View.

 

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Title: Population, nesting habitat, and reproductive success of American Black Oystercatchers on the west coast of Vancouver Island.

Year: 1991

Author(s): Kees Vermeer; Ken Morgan; Peter Ewins; G.E. John Smith

Type: Proceedings

Description:
abstract: The nesting population of American Black Oyster-catchers Haematopus bachmani was censused and their island and nest site habitat were investigated in Barkley Sound and in the Flores Island-Cape Beale region of the west coast of Vancouver Island in 1989. pp65-70.

 

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Title: Habitat analysis and co-occurrence of seabirds on the west coast of Vancouver Island.

Year: 1991

Author(s): Kees Vermeer; Ken Morgan; G.E. John Smith

Type: Proceedings

Description:
abstract: The distribution of pelagic birds on the west coast of Vancouver Island was related to physical and biological parameters and co-occurrence of bird species during spring, summer and fall. Twenty-six significant correlations of pelagive birds with water depth 31 with distance from land, 18 with surface salinity, and 20 with surface temperature were observed. pp.78-85.

 

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Title: Marine bird populations and habitat use in a fjord on the west coast of Vancouver Island.

Year: 1991

Author(s): Kees Vermeer; Ken Morgan

Type: Proceedings

Description:
abstract: Marine bird populations in Alberni Channel were surveyed monthly from September 1987 through August 1988. pp86-96.

 

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Title: Seasonal abundance and biomass of birds in eelgrass habitats in Browning Passage on the west coast of Vancouver Island.

Year: 1991

Author(s): Rob Butler, Canadian Wildlife Service; Adrian Dorst; Mark Hobson

Type: Proceedings

Description:
abstract: The Western Sandpiper Calidris mauri was the most abundant bird species seen in Browning Passage over a one year period and was most plentiful in April and August. Shorebirds as a group made up less than 2 percent of the annual bird biomass. Geese, diving ducks, and dabbling ducks made up nearly 34 percent of all birds seen through the year and nearly 80 percent of the bird biomass. They were least abundant in summer. pp109-113.

 

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Title: Environmental disturbance and conservation of marine and shoreline birds on the west coast of Vancouver Island.

Year: 1991

Author(s): Kees Vermeer; Ken Morgan; Robert Butler

Type: Proceedings

Description:
abstract: Loss of habitat and oiling of birds represents two major threats to marine and shoreline bird populations on the west coast of Vancouver Island. Logging of mature and old-growth forests has led to the destruction of the nesting habitat of Marbled Murrelets Brachyramphus marmoratus, whereas industrial development of estuaries, mudflats and spawning grounds of Pacific herring Clupea harengus pallasi has diminished feeding habitats for other marine and shoreline birds. Fisheries operations, human disturbance of colonies, and introduced predators, notably racoon Procyon lotot and mink Mustela vison, have impacted upon local populations. Management actions and research needs to mitigate these threats are addressed. pp129-133.

 

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Title: Sampling Methods for Amphibians in Streams in the Pacific Northwest

Year: 1991

Author(s): Bruce Bury; Paul Stephen Corn

Type: Book

 

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Title: Wildlife-Habitat Relationships: Sampling Procedures for Pacific Northwest Vertebrates

Year: 1991

Author(s): Andrew B. Carey; L. Ruggiero

Type: Report (unpublished)

 

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Title: Monitoring Guidelines to Evaluate Effects of Forestry Activities on Streams in the Pacific Northwest and Alaska

Year: 1991

Author(s): Lee H. MacDonald; Alan W. Smart; Robert C. Wissmar

Type: Report (published)

Description:
"This document provides guidance for designing water quality monitoring projects and selecting monitoring parameters. Although the focus is on forest management and streams in the Pacific Northwest and Alaska, a broader perspective is taken, and much of the information is more widely applicable..."

 

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Title: Profiles of the Undeveloped Watersheds on Vancouver Island

Year: 1991

Author(s): Keith Moore

Type: Report (unpublished)

Description:
Introduction: Recent studies have focussed on identifying the number and location of the "undeveloped primary watersheds" in the coastal temperate forests of British Columbia. This work has determined that, on the west coast of Vancouver island, there are 60 primary watersheds that are larger than 5000 ha. Seven of these watersheds are classified as "undeveloped." These are the Moyeha, Megin and Sydney in Clayoqout Sound...".

 

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Title: Geographic and local variation in nesting phenology and clutch size of the black oystercatcher

Year: 1991

Author(s): Marie-Aude L'Hyver; Edward H. Miller

Type: Journal Article

Description:
The Black Oystercatcher (Haematopus bachmani) is a year-round resident with an extensive range from southern Californi to Alasak. Because of the size of this range and its simple, nearly linerar shape, we hypothesized that the species would exhibit adaptive geographic variation in nesting phenology and clutch size. Museum egg collections provided information for the entire nesting range, while field observations on about 40 breeding pairs on Cleland Island, BC, providing information on local variation.

 

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Title: Geographic and local variation in nesting phenology and clutch size of the black oystercatcher

Year: 1991

Author(s): Marie-Aude L'Hyver; Edward H. Miller

Type: Journal Article

Description:
The Black Oystercatcher (Haematopus bachmani) is a year-round resident with an extensive range from southern Californi to Alasak. Because of the size of this range and its simple, nearly linerar shape, we hypothesized that the species would exhibit adaptive geographic variation in nesting phenology and clutch size. Museum egg collections provided information for the entire nesting range, while field observations on about 40 breeding pairs on Cleland Island, BC, providing information on local variation.

 

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Title: Environmental Impacts of Forest Management Practices in Tree Farm Licence 44 and Tree Farm Licence 46

Year: 1991

Author(s): Egan Ecological Services

Type: Report (unpublished)

Description:
Introduction: The environmental impact of forest management practices has been a topic of considerable debate for some time in British Columbia. Environmental and citizen groups have led the debate from one side, charting that practices such as clearcutting, slashburning and roadbuilding have had an continue to have serious negative impacts on the forest environment. Often, these claims have been documented by the media. In some cases these claims have been supported by resource management professionals. On the other side, forest industry spokespersons, while admitting that their practices created eyesorts, have consistently denied that their management practices are harmful, and point to vigorously growing second-growth forests as proof. Furthermore, they often maintain that they are simply acting within government legislation or guidelines. Nowhere has the debate over the environmental impacts of forst practices been so hotly contested as in Tree Farm Licences ((TFLs) 44 and 46 on southwestern Vancouver Island. In the early 1980s, MacMillan Bloedel's plan to log Meares Island (part of TFL 44) was thwarted by native and other protesters. Since then, both MacMIllan Bloedel and Fletcher Challenge have had to deal with protests throughout TFLs 44 and 46 (e.g., Sulphur Passage, Carmanah, Tofino Creek, Nahmint, Walbran). These protests have centered around three key sisues - the environmental impacts of forestry practices, the need to reserve more wilderness/old growth forest areas, and the need to recognize native land claims. This report deals with the first issue and addresses the question: "What are the environmental impacts of current forest management practices in TFLs 44 and 46?" This is a question which requires a clear answer before the Management and Working Plans for TFLs 44 and 46, currently before the public, can be considered for approval. This report will show that current forest management practices are having serious negative impacts on forest biological diversity and on long-term forest productivity. While some of the impacts documented here are inferred from studies conducted elsewhere, they are general enough to be applicable to TFLs 44 and 46. Wherever possible, examples of such impacts within TFLs 44 and 46 are provided. Of late, spokespersons for both the forest industry and the British Columbia Ministry of Forests have admitted that forest management "mistakes" have been made in the past and that these have caused environmental degradation (e.g., landslides, destruction of fish habitat). They insist, however, that such practices are no longer employed and that such degradation no longer occurs. While some practices have undoubtedly improved, it is clear that these changes are not significant enough to avoid the many negative impacts of forest management documented in this report.

 

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Title: [Documents from the Tofino Creek Integrated Resource Management Planning Committee: Miscellaneous statistics, maps, reference documents, and newspaper clippings]

Year: 1990

Author(s): Tofino Creek Integrated Resource Management Planning Committee

Type: Committee File

Description:
Volume one: Tofino Creek statistics, on plant and bird species, park use, etc; approx. 30 pp. Volume two: maps, mostly unlabelled; approx. 10 pp. Volume three: reference documents from the planning process, on fish and forest habitat, watershed planning, slope stability, aquaculture opportunities; approx. 10 documents. Volume four: newspaper clippings, from Times-Colonist, Interior News, and others; approx. 5 pp.

 

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Title: Autoecology of Common Plants in British Columbia: A Literature Review

Year: 1990

Author(s): S. Haeussler

Type: Report (published)

 

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Title: Deer and Elk Habitats in Coastal Forests of Southern British Columbia

Year: 1990

Type: Book

 

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Title: Benthic Impacts of Salmon Farming in British Columbia

Year: 1990

Author(s): Stephen F. Cross, Aquametrix Research Ltd.

Type: Report (unpublished)

Description:
"A comprehensive study was implemented to assess the benthis impacts of salmon farming in British Columbia. The eight farm sites employed in this study were situated in areas representative of the wide range of physical oceanographic conditions in order to document the variation in environmental impacts associated with finfish aquaculture operations on this coast."

 

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Title: Factors affecting colony attendance by Ancient Murrelets (Synthliboramphus antiquus)

Year: 1990

Author(s): Ian Jones, University of Toronto; Anthony Gaston; Bruce Falls

Type: Journal Article

Description:
We studied factors influencing variation in nightly levels of activity (birds arriving and vocalizing) and numbers of birds staging offshore at a colony of Ancient Murrelets at Reef Island, British Columbia, during 1984, 1985, and 1986. Activity was restricted to the hours of darkness and extremely variable in magnitude from night to night. The rate of entry into burrows tended to decease, and the amount of vocalization and numbers of birds at the staging area increased during the nesting season. We detected an underlying 4-day cyclical pattern of attendance. Nightly variability of activity at the colony was effected by moonlight and weather conditions. Since activity, particularly vocalization, was reduced on moonlight nights, we suggest that nocturnal colony attendance is a strategy to avoid diurnal predators in this species. The largest numbers of birds were present and vocalizing at the colony on calm moonless nights. Weather conditions explained a substantial proportion of the night to night variability in murrelt activity. Among weather variables, wind speed had the most consistent effect and was particularly important in 1985. Both short/term, i.e., of a particular night, and long-term, i.e., over the previous 3 days, conditions influenced activity. Our observations suggest that direct weather effects at the colony may be more important than weather effects related to foraging conditions. Interyear differences in activity may have resulted from the interaction of weather and general foraging conditions.

 

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Title: Daily Foraging Behavior of marbled murrelets

Year: 1990

Author(s): Harry Carter; Spencer Sealy

Type: Journal Article

Description:
Patterns of at-sea dispersion, flocking, distributions, flights, and fish-holding behavior of marbled murrelets (Brachyramphus marmoratus) in Barkley Sound, British Columbia, were synthesized into a descriptive model of daily foraging behavior. Murrelets were clumped in coastal and sill areas in Trevor Channel and used the same feeding sites each day. Adults rearing nestlings flew to and aggregated at feeding sites at or before dawn, fed themselves there early in the day, flew to other areas later in the day to search for prey for nestlings, and returned to nest sites to feed chicks mainly at or after dusk. At this time, adult murrelets minimized time required to feed themselves by specializing on abundant and easily-found prey. Consequently, this maximized time to obtain prey for nestlings, which were less abundant and more difficult to locate. This system may be facilitated by solitary foraging.

 

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Title: Fish Habitat Inventory & Information Program: Stream Survey Field Guide

Year: 1989

Author(s): Department of Fisheries and Oceans

Type: Report (unpublished)

 

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Title: Role of nest raiding and egg predation in regulating population density of threespine sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) in a coastal British Columbia lake

Year: 1989

Author(s): K. D. Hyatt; N. H. Ringler

Type: Journal Article

Description:
The consequences of nest raiding and egg predation for population regulation of sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) were studied in a British Columbia coastal lake. Stickleback eggs were present in the stomachs of 23 and 11% of all sticklebacks sampled in the field in 1982 and 1985 respectively. On average, males consumed more eggs than females did. Seasonal egg consumption increased with increases in stickleback density in breeding colonies. Our evidence suggests that both nest raiding and egg cannibalism are important in limiting the production of stickleback fry as population density increases in scattered, lakeshore, breeding colonies of Kennedy Lake.

 

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Title: Fish Survey of S.E. Clayoquot Sound Streams, Vancouver Island

Year: 1989

Author(s): T.G. Brown; B.C. Anderson; J.C. Scrivener; I.V. Williams

Type: Report (published)

Description:
Minnow traps were used to capture juvenile salmonids from six locations in each of the twenty-three S.E. Clayoquot Sound Streams. At each location the environmental features were noted, recorded, and scales were obtained for salmonid age determination. Juvenile coho catch/effort, mean length of one stream surveyed. The mean catch at each location was correlated to various environmental features such as: dominant biogeoclimatic variant, gradient, stream order, stream orientation and stream location.

 

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Title: Bald Eagle Nesting Relative to Forestry Operations on MacMillan Bloedel Forest Lands

Year: 1989

Author(s): Elaine ONeil

Type: Academic Thesis

Description:
Portions of the Gulf Islands, Johnstone Strait and the west coast of Vancouver island were surveyed to determine the locations and productivity of nesting bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) and impacts of logging on nesting success. A total of 131 nests were located of which 43 were active. Of these,69 nests were surveyed on the ground to collect nest tree, site and stand data. Information on the distance to and impact of forestry practices was collected where possible. On average, no significant differences in bald eagle use of nests were found between disturbed and undisturbed areas. No significant differences in tree, site, and stand characteristics were found between active and inactive nests. There were significantly more young produced/active nest in undisturbed areas. Nest tree size was significantly larger in disturbed areas. Based on these findings and research in the U.S., interim guidelines are suggested for B.C. Future management directions should emphasize reaching consensus on the amount of habitat that should be retained in B.C., on identifying the most suitable habitat for eagles, and on monitoring the population to determine more thoroughly the impact of forest harvesting.

 

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Title: Fish Survey of S. E. Clayoquot Sound Streams, Vancouver Island

Year: 1989

Author(s): T. G. Brown; B. C. Andersen; J. C. Scrivener; I. V. Williams

Type: Report (published)

Description:
Minnow traps were used to capture juvenile salmonids from six locations in each of twenty-three S. E. Clayoquot Sound streams. At each location, the environmental features were noted, the length and weight of all captured juvenile coho were recorded, and scales were obtained for salmonid age determination. Juvenile coho catch/effort, mean length of one year old coho, and percent two year olds were calculated for each stream surveyed. The mean catch at each location was correlated to various environmental features such as: dominant biogeoclimative variant, gradient, stream order, stream orientation and stream location. The mean catch at each location was also correlated with vegetation type, vegetation age, percentage in-stream cover, cover type, and substrate type. Few results were statistically significant because catches and age compositions were highly variable and sample sizes were small.

 

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Title: Winter diet of Vancouver Island marten (Martes americana)

Year: 1989

Author(s): David W. Nagorsen; Karen F. Morrison; Joan E. Forsberg

Type: Journal Article

Description:
Digestive tracts from 701 martens (Martes americana) of known sex and age taken during the 1983-1986 fur harvests were used to determine winter diet of marten from Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Small mammals, deer, birds and salmonid fish were the major food items. Marten exploited nine species of small mammals including four introduced species, but more than 50% of the small mammal prey were deer mice. We attributed most deer remains to carrion. Avian prey was primarily small passerine and piciform species with Winter Wrens accounting for about 40% of the identifiable bird remains. Salmon remains were from bait consumption and fish exploited during the spawning runs. Although minor intersexual variation in diet was evident with females consuming more small mammals and small birds, dietary overlap between sexes was pronounced in this insular population.

 

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Title: The vocal repertoire of the ancient Murrelet

Year: 1989

Author(s): Ian Jones, University of Toronto; Bruce Falls; Anthony Gaston

Type: Journal Article

Description:
We investigated the vocalizations of the Ancient Murrelet (Synthliboramphus antiguus), a seabird of the North Pacific. To determine how the size and structure of their vocal repertoire relates to their nocturnal activity at breeding colonies. Nine distinct vocal displays were found, a repertoire of similar size to that of two other alcid species and several passerines. Most vocalizations consisted of broad band sounds with rapid frequency and amplitude modulation. The chirrup call, a short (0.5 sec) vocalization performed in many situations, did not differ in use or structure between the sexes. Chirrups had great individual stereotype in structure, important in individual recognition of parents by young and possibly between mates. Song, a complex vocal display performed by males, was usually given from perches high in trees in the colony. Song may function in courtship and mate attraction, but apparently not for defense of long-lasting territories. Several song variants were recorded, at least one of which appeared to function as an agonistic signal to other males. Ancient Murrelet vocalizations have simple 'combinatorial' properties in that they consist of a few acoustic elements combined in various sequences to produce vocal displays with different functions. Although there was little evidence that the Ancient Murrelet repertoire was larger than those of other alcids, the vocalizations were structurally more complex and include the song-like male advertising display. This likely relates to the nocturnal timing of social behavior of this species, which must restrict the usefulness of visual displays. We conclude that Ancient Murrelet vocal signals exhibit a number of adaptions to the unusual habits of this nocturnal, forest-nesting seabird.