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Your search for Habitat returned 322 records. Showing Records 226 to 255. Please Select a Record to View.

 

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Title: Marine birds and aquaculture in British Columbia. Assessment and Management of interactions.

Year: 1989

Author(s): Jaqueline Booth; Harriet Rueggenberg

Type: Government document

Description:
This report documents the results of Phase II of a project aimed at assessing the effects of BC's growing aquaculture industry on its marine bird populations. In this phase, the extent of geographical overlap between areas of current and potential aquaculture development and areas used by marine birds was examined, indicating the bird species, types of aquaculture and areas of the coast involved.The project is comprised of three phases. Phase I reviewed the relevant literature, describing the nature of interactions that can occur between marine birds and the various types of aquaculture, and providing an analytical framework for the subsequent phases (Booth and Rueggeberg, 1988). In Phase II, a computer database and geographical informations system is developed to examine the overlap between areas of current and potential aquaculture development and areas of marine bird habitat. Phase III consists of two studies that examine on-site interactions between birds and aquaculture, one dealing with salmon farming and the other with mussel farming (Rueggeberg and Booth, 1989.

 

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Title: Marine birds and aquaculture in British Columbia: Assessment and Management of Interactions

Year: 1989

Author(s): H. Rueggenberg; J. Booth

Type: Government document

Description:
This report documents the results of Phase III of a project aimed at assessing the effects of BC's growing aquaculture industry on its marine bird populations. The project is comprised of three phases. Phase I reviewed the relevant literature, describing the nature of interactions that can occur between marine birds and the various types of aquaculture, and providing an analytical framework for the subsequent phases (Booth and Rueggeberg, 1988). In Phase II, a computer database and geographical informations system is developed to examine the overlap between areas of current and potential aquaculture development and areas of marine bird habitat. Phase III consists of two studies that examine on-site interactions between birds and aquaculture, one dealing with salmon farming (Rueggeberg and Booth, 1989) and the other with mussel farming (this report).

 

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Title: Timber Management for the Provision of Moose Habitat.

Year: 1988

Author(s): Ontario, Ministry of Natural Resources, Wildlife Branch

Type: Report (published)

 

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Title: Timber Management Guidelines for the Protection of Fish Habitat

Year: 1988

Author(s): Ontario, Ministry of Natural Resources, Fisheries Branch

Type: Report (published)

 

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Title: Changes in Wildlife Communities Near Edges

Year: 1988

Author(s): Richard H. Yahner

Type: Journal Article

 

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Title: Edge Effects and Conservation of Biotic Diversity

Year: 1988

Author(s): Larry D. Harris

Type: Journal Article

 

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Title: Wildlife Habitat Handbook for the Southern Interior Ecoprovince: Habitat Relationship Models for Selected Birds

Year: 1988

Author(s): Ralph Ritcey; David Low; Richard Howie; Andrew P. Harcombe

Type: Report (published)

 

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Title: Wildlife Habitat Handbook for the Southern Interior Ecoprovince: Species Notes for Amphibians

Year: 1988

Author(s): Stan A. Orchard

Type: Report (published)

 

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Title: Wildlife Habitat Handbook for the Southern Interior Ecoprovince: Species-Habitat Relationship Models for Amphibians

Year: 1988

Author(s): Stan A. Orchard; Andrew P. Harcombe

Type: Report (published)

 

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Title: Wildlife Habitat Handbook for the Southern Interior Ecoprovince: Species-Habitat Relationship Models for Mammals

Year: 1988

Author(s): Ralph Ritcey; David Low; Alton Harestad; Wayne R. Campbell; Andrew P. Harcombe

Type: Report (published)

 

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Title: Wildlife Habitat Handbook for the Southern Interior Ecoprovince: Species-Habitat Relationship Models for Reptiles

Year: 1988

Author(s): Stan A. Orchard; Andrew P. Harcombe

Type: Report (published)

 

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Title: From the Forest to the Sea: A story of fallen trees

Year: 1988

Type: Report (published)

Description:
Chapter 1: The forest portion of the ecosystem is the sum of three diverse, mutually dependent components: physical structures, biological entities, and ecological functions. These components are dynamic, continually developing diversity. Chapter 2: Explains how living and dead trees are linked together in the living machinery of a forest.

 

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Title: Occurrence of Cancer crab (C. magister and C. oregonensis) megalopae off the west coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia.

Year: 1988

Author(s): Glen S. Jamieson; Antan C. Phillips

Type: Journal Article

Description:
The seasonal and cross-shelf occurrences of Cancer crab (C magister and C. oregonensis) megalopae in 1985 along a transect line perpendicular to the coast off Tofino, BC, are presented. Megalopae of both species were generally absent from surface waters during daylight hours. The two species may have slight temporal differences in nocturnal surface abundance, with C. magister occuring later in the evening and earlier in the morning than C. oregonensis. Their relative occurrence at the surface during the night was used to calibrate cross-shelf megalopal abundance data. Cross-shelf megalopal intermolt stage proportions were calculated, relating degree of megalopal development to proximity of nearshore habitat required for successful settlement of larvae. Cancer magister megalopae were present from April to August, with peak abundance in May and June. Megalope were abundant in a broad band 37-148 km from shore, with peak abundance 56 km offshore in June. In May, some late stage megalope were collected in coastal inlets but settlement appeared low in coastal study areas. Megalopal abundance decreased abruptly shoreward of 28 km from the coast. Cancer oregonensis megalopae were also present from April to August, with their pattern of cross-shelf abundance basically smilar to that of C. magister. However, in contrast to C. magister, abundance of late stage megalopae in coastal inlets was relatively high in June, indicating that a significant settlement of megalopae of this species could have occurred. Evidence for cross-shelf movement of Cancer megalope is discussed.

 

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Title: An Experimental Transplant of Northern Abalone, Haliotis kamtschatkana, in Barkley Sound, British Columbia

Year: 1988

Author(s): B. Emmett; G. S. Jamieson

Type: Journal Article

Description:
The biological and economic feasibilities of transplanting northern abalone, Haliotis kamtschatkana, from exposed beds to two sites in sheltered, productive abalone habitat were investigated. After nine months, 39% and 72% of transplanted abalone were recovered at the two replicate sites. Recovery of tagged abalone at a control site, situated in the exposed source area, was 32%. Growth in shell length of transplanted abalone over the nine months averaged 7.8% whereas the average growth of non-transplanted controls was 3.7%, significantly less. There was little emigration of abalone from the transplant sites. The study concludes that it is feasible to transplant 50-100 mm H. kamtschatkana in order to enhance growth. The economic feasibility of transplants is dependent on site-specific recovery rates and the costs of harvesting seed abalone. The population dynamics of abalone in exposed beds and the long-term potential for enhancing abalone settlement by introducing broodstock to deplete areas are two aspects which now require investigation.

 

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Title: Sandpiper Survey of the Tofino Mudflats

Year: 1988

Author(s): Mark Hobson

Type: Report (unpublished)

Description:
Introduction: The tidal mudflats near Tofino between the Esowista Peninsula and Meares Island are used by migrating shorebird during spring and fall migrations and as an over-wintering site for waterfowl. Surveys of the winter waterfowl have been conducted by the B. C. Fish and Wildlife Branch in 1972 and 1983, and in 1986 a survey of the shorebird populations utilizing the mudflats through the summer months was sponsored by B. C. Fish and Wildlife Branch and Ducks Unlimited. The purpose of this study was to gather data on the population size of Western Sandpipers (Calidris mauri) on Tofino mudflats during spring and summer of 1988.

 

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Title: Effects of intensive forest management on breeding birds of Vancouver Island. Problem Analysis.

Year: 1988

Author(s): K.L. Sadoway

Type: Government document

Description:
This publication is one of three companion publications resulting from a problem analysis on the effects of intensive forest management on non-ungulate wildlife of Vancouver Island. Non-ungulate species include all amphibian, reptile, bird, and mammal (excluding deer and elk) species that occur on Vancouver Island.

 

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Title: Time budget and parental behavior of breeding American Black Oystercathchers in British Columbia

Year: 1987

Author(s): M.A. Purdy; E.H> Miller

Type: Journal Article

Description:
From the results section: "In this section, behavioral differences between the sexes at each stage of breeding and changes in their behavior over the breeding season are considered."

 

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Title: Applying 15 Years of Carnation Creek Results

Year: 1987

Type: Report (unpublished)

Description:
none

 

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Title: Our Wildlife Heritage

Year: 1987

Type: Book

Description:
From the back cover:" Wild creatures and their living space have been of both interest and concern for all recorded history. The concept of of conservation and a conservation "ethic" is, however, a quite recent phenomenon, dating back to the first decade of this century..."

 

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Title: Protecting Our Seabird Colonies

Year: 1987

Author(s): Gary Kaiser; Moira Lemon

Type: Magazine article

Description:
none

 

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Title: Notes on Beach Dwelling Polychaete Worms

Year: 1987

Author(s): Barry Campbell

Type: Miscellaneous Notes

Description:
none

 

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Title: Mycorrhizae, mycorrhizospheres, and reforestation: current knowledge and research needs

Year: 1987

Author(s): D.A. Perry, Oregan State University; R. Molina; M.P. Amaranthus

Type: Journal Article

Description:
Although not a panacea, management of mycorrhizae and associated organism is an important reforestation aid. Its three major components are protection of the indigenous soil community and evaluation of inoculation need, integration of inoculation programs into existing reforestation technology, and research. Clear-cutting frequently results in reduced mycorrhizae formation, particularly when reforestation is delayed and no other host plants are present to maintain fungal populations. Implications of such reductions for reforestation vary with environmental factors and tree species. Adequate mycorrhiza formation is especially critical for ectomycorrhizal trees growing on poor soils or in environments where seedlings must establish quickly to survive. It may also be important where early successional, noncrop plants do not support the same mycobiont as the crop. In such circumstances, a self-reinforcing trend may develop, with poor mycorrhiza formation reducing seedling survival and poor tree stocking leading to further loss of mycorrhizal inocula. Inoculating nursery seedlings with mycobionts holds promise for improving outplanting performance only if site-adapted fungi are used. A practical alternative is to improve nursery practices to enhance natural populations of mycorrhizal fungi. Seedlings leaving the nursery with diverse mycorrhizae may perform better than those leaving with only one or a few nursery-adapted types.

 

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Title: A Hierarchical Framework for Stream Habitat Classification: Viewing Streams in a Watershed Context

Year: 1986

Author(s): Christopher A. Frissell; William J. Liss; Charles E. Warren; Michael D. Hurley

Type: Journal Article

 

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Title: Lost Shoe Creek habitat inventory report, Long Beach Unit - PRNP, 1985

Year: 1986

Type: Report (published)

Description:
An inventory of the fisheries resource was conducted by the Warden Service and a fish biologist on Lost Shoe Creek (LSC) during the Summer of 1985.

 

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Title: Functional Relationships between salal understory and forest overstory

Year: 1986

Author(s): D.J. Vales

Type: Academic Thesis

Description:
Abundance of salal (Gaultheria shallon Pursh) and its relationship to forest overstory were studied in immature forest stands on Vancouver Island having some topographical characteristics of deer winter ranges. Plots sampled over a range of stocking levels indicated that salal density was strongly related to single forest stand characteristics (r= 0.92-0.94) but predictive equations differed between plant associations. Most equations predicting salal biomass or cover did not differ between plant associations. Most equations predicting salal biomass or cover did not differ between plant associations. Equations calculated from data from single stands accounted for more of the variation in salal abundance (r= 0.73-0.97) than equations developed from data from several stands (r= 0.39-0.92). Mean salal shoot height was greatest under overstory cover of 65 to 80%.