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Your search for Habitat returned 322 records. Showing Records 251 to 280. Please Select a Record to View.

 

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Title: Wildlife Habitat Handbooks for British Columbia: Standard Taxonomic List and Codes of Amphibians, Reptiles, Birds, and Mammals

Year: 1985

Author(s): Wayne R. Campbell; Andrew P. Harcombe

Type: Report (published)

 

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Title: The Ecology of Natural Disturbance and Patch Dynamics

Year: 1985

Type: Book

Description:
"Ecologists have always been aware of the importance of natural dynamics in ecosystems, but historically, the focus has been on successional development of equilibrium communities. While this approach has generated appreciable understanding of the composition and functioning of ecosystems, recently many workers have turned their attention to processes of disturbance themselves and to the evolutionary significance of such events. This shifted emphasis has inspired studies in diverse systems. We use the phrase "patch dynamics: to describe their common focus."

 

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Title: Enhancing the Establishment and Growth of Arboreal Forage Lichens in Intensively Managed Forests

Year: 1985

Author(s): S. K. Stevenson

Type: Report (published)

Description:
Arboreal lichens of the genera Alectoria, Bryoria and perhaps Usnea, are a major winter forage item for black-tailed deer on Vancouver Island. Those lichens grow in the forest canopy and are most commonly available to the deer as litterfall on the forest floor. Availability of lichen litterfall is one of the several key habitat features of old-growth stands that area used by black-tailed deer as winter range. Managers responsible for integrating intensive forestry and wildlife management on Vancouver Island seek means by which forestry practices can be used to create suitable winter habitat for black-tailed deer in second-growth stands. The abundance of arboreal lichens in immature timber stands is characteristically low. It is the purpose of this problem analysis to explore the factors that may be acting to limit the abundance of arboreal lichens in young stands, and to identify experimental techniques and management practices that might enhance the establishment and growth of forage lichens in second growth.

 

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Title: Intensive forestry effects on Vancouver Island deer and elk habitats. Problem Analysis.

Year: 1985

Author(s): J.B. Nyberg

Type: Government document

Description:
This problem analysis was requested by the Technical Working Group directing the integrated Wildlife - Intensive Forestry research program on Vancouver Island. Its goal is to evaluate research priorities concerning the ways in which intensive forest management will affect habitat values for deer and elk. Other studies will focus on the ways these animals use their habitats e.g. habitat selection and population responses), and will be coordinated with the forestry/habitat investigations that will follow from this problem analysis.

 

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Title: Forest crowns, snow interception and management of black-tailed deer winter habitat.

Year: 1985

Author(s): R.S. McNay

Type: Government document

Description:
The phenomenon of snow interception by forest stands is examined. Interception relationships extracted from literature are evaluated for their applicability to the silvicultural and climatic conditions of south coastal British Columbia. Hypothesis tested address: 1) the prediction of snow interception, 2) comparisons of heterogeneity in snow interception between second-growth and old-growth forests, and 3) how interception and interception efficiency vary depending on forest crown completeness and storm size. General relationships regarding snow interception under continental conditions were found to hold in coastal conditions, but relationships between crown completeness and interception were weak. Storm size and melt are identifies as confounding factors in making predictions about snow inerception based on stand crown completeness.

 

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Title: Deer movements and habitat use during winter

Year: 1985

Author(s): J.B. Nyberg; D. Doyle; L. Peterson

Type: Government document

Description:
The research topic identified as having the highest priority was how forestry practices could be used to create suitable black-tailed deer and Roosevelt elk winter habitat in young-growth stands. This working plan provided details of the research to be conducted on deer winter habitat during the winter of 1984/85.

 

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Title: Interactions between black-tailed deer and intensive forest management

Year: 1985

Author(s): R.S. McNay; R. Davies

Type: Government document

Description:
This problem analysis was requested by the Technical Working Group (TWG) directing the Integrated Wildlife-Intensive Forestry Research (IWIFR) program on Vancouver Island. It deals specifically with the ways that intensive forestry treatments modify the manner in which Columbian black-tailed deer select, use, and respond to various habitats. The objectives are: to define the problems associated with interactions between deer and intensive forestry; to review present knowledge about the problem and to identify information gaps related to it; to identify research topics; to suggest priorities for research; and to recommend approaches to high priority topics.

 

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Title: Cleland Island

Year: 1985

Author(s): Martin Ross

Type: Magazine article

Description:
none

 

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Title: A Research Approach to Solving Fish/Forestry Interactions in Relation to Mass Wasting on the Queen Charlotte Islands

Year: 1984

Author(s): BC Ministry of Forests

Type: Report (published)

 

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Title: Gabion Evaluation for Salmonid Enhancement in a Landslide Impacted Stream on the Queen Charlotte Islands, British Columbia

Year: 1984

Author(s): Herbert D. Klassen

Type: Report (published)

Description:
"This paper may be of interest to foresters, fish biologists, and fisheries managers alike. The major purpose of the paper was to evaluate one method of rehabilitation of a debris-torrented stream, with respect to fish production. Guidelines for the gabion installation were included, as was a benefit-cost analysis." Paper of the Fish Forestry Interaction Program.

 

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Title: The Seen and Unseen World of the Fallen Tree

Year: 1984

Type: Report (published)

Description:
Large, fallen trees in various stages of decay contribute much-needed diversity to terrestrial and aquatic habitats in western forests. When most biological activity in soil is limited by low moisture availability in summer, the fallen tree-soil interface offers a relatively cool, moist habitat for animals and a substrate for microbial and root activity. Intensified utilization and management can deprive future forests of large, fallen trees. The impact of this loss on habitat diversity and on long-term forest productivity must be determined because managers need sound information on which to base resource management decisions.

 

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Title: A Morphological and Electrophoretic comparison of Rainbow Trout (Salmo gairdneri) above and below barriers on five streams on Vancouver island, BC

Year: 1984

Author(s): E Parkinson; R.J. Behnke; W Pollard

Type: Report (published)

Description:
None

 

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Title: Density of fish and salamanders in relation to riparian canopy and physical habitat in streams of the northwestern United States

Year: 1983

Author(s): Charles Hawkins; M. Murphy

Type: Journal Article

 

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Title: Density of fish and salamanders in relation to riparian canopy and physical habitat in streams of the northwestern United States

Year: 1983

Author(s): C.P. Hawkins

Type: Journal Article

 

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Title: Ecosystems of MacMillan Park on Vancouver Island

Year: 1982

Author(s): A. E. Inselberg; K. Klinka; C. Ray

Type: Report (published)

Description:
This report gives the results of a synecological study carried out in MacMillan Park on Vancouver Island, an area approximately 90 hectares that features a striking old growth forst of Douglas-fir, western hemlock, western redcedar and grand fir once common on similar habitats throughout the British Columbia Lower Mainland and Vancouver Island before the onset of loggin. The study is done in accordance with the ecosystem classification methods used by the Ministry of Forests in the Vancouver Forest Region and is one of the most detailed ecological studies undertaken to date in the region. Techniques of ecological analysis at levels of the biogeocoenotic association, type and variation are described with emphasis on floristic structure and composition. Ten associations are identified and subdivided, where apprpriate, into types and variations. General and specific intperpretations of the units are given, with the aim of providing an understanding of the forest ecosystems in order that management practices can be devised which will preserve the integrity of the park and enhance the recreational activities associated with it. A detailed ecosystem map at the scale of 1:2500 supplements the report. The map outlines associations, generalized classes of forest and shrub cover, as well as recreational values. The recreation values are intended to make the map more readily useful for the purposes of managemenet activities.

 

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Title: Winter Waterbirds of Meares Island

Year: 1982

Author(s): A. S. Harestad; B. M. Van Der Raay

Type: Report (unpublished)

Description:
from Introduction: "...Sheltered bays and food-rich tide flats of Meares Island are used as staging and resting areas for shorebirds and waterfowl during spring and fall passage. These areas are also used as wintering areas by waterbirds that spend the breeding season elsewhere. In light of public concern for birds, the Ministry of Forests supported this study to investigate the use of waters surrounding Meares Island by waterbirds during winter and to provide information on the probable impact of logging and storage activities on these birds. ..."

 

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Title: Predator-Ungulate Relationships In Second Growth Forests On Vancouver Island. Problem Analysis.

Year: 1982

Author(s): Ian Hatter

Type: Government document

Description:
The effects and influences of predation on ungulates are reviewed. Predation is a significant source of mortality and influences the distribution and habitat selection of native ungulates. Predation effects and influences on Vancouver Island deer and elk are reviewed and contrasted with those of the rest of North America. Predation on deer is particularly severe due to high wolf population densities and the probable additive effects of cougar and bear predation and human deer harvests. Wolves probably indluence seasonal movements and habitat selection of deer and elk but the available information is inconclusive. The potential effects and influences of wolf predation on ungulate populations in second growth forests is high. It presents a major confounding factor in interpreting deer and elk habitat utilization, animal condition, and population parameters. However, it is suggested that wolves should not be viewed as a confounding influence on intensive wildlife intensive forestry management but as an integral component of a managed predator-ungulate-habitat system. Specific problems and unknowns of predation are also identified. It is recommended that predation studies be implemented immediately.

 

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Title: A bibliography on the wolverine Gulo gulo

Year: 1982

Author(s): V.A. Banci

Type: Government document

Description:
This bibliography is an attempt to identify existing information. Early historical accounts as well as more recent reports are included.

 

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Title: Coastal Waterfowl and Habitat Inventory Program: Summary Report Appendices

Year: 1982

Author(s): R. A. Hunter, Terrestrial Studies Branch, BC Ministry of Environment; L. E. Jones, Ducks Unlimited

Type: Report (unpublished)

Description:
Introduction: This document is one result of a three-year program designed to evaluate coastal wetlands of British Columbia. It is intended to provide a reconnaissance level assessment of the biological attributes of tidal wetlands and indicate social factors, developmental pressures and opportunity for rehabilitation and enhancement associated with them. To date, 403 wetlands have been assessed. Of these the majority are estuarine areas although selected sloughs, mudlats and freshwater coastal lowlands were included. Ratings for the various wetlands were determined by Rodget Hunter, Ken Summers and the following BC Fish and Wildlife Branch staff: Davies, Harding, Burgess, Cox, Swatcaviatcz, West, Beets, Edie, van Drimmellen. The primary purpose of this evaluation program was to indicate the relative importance of individual coastal wetlands of the province with respect to preservation, protection and enhancement. Potential uses of this information area: 1. land-use planners within various provincial government ministries 2. natural resource managers 3. agencies and private organizations involved in acquisition and/or protection and preservation of wetlands.

 

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Title: Vegetation Units of the Hesquiat Harbour Area 1981-05-21

Year: 1981

Author(s): Andrew Harcombe

Type: Report (published)

Description:
Introduction: The vegetation study was requested by the Archaeology Division of the British Columbia Provincial Museum, which is presently involved in a large archaeological study of the Hesquiat Harbour area, at the request of the Hesquiat Cultural Committee of the Hesquiat Indian Band. This report describes and maps the vegetation of the Hesquiat Harbour area. Hesquiat Harbour is located on the outer west coast of Vancouver Island, near Estevan POint. The specific study area includes the Hesquiat Peninsula and lower elevation areas bordering Hesquiat Harbour. The information contained within the vegetation report will later be incorporated into a larger report, with a discussion of quaternary history, terrain descriptions, soil descriptions, and faunal descriptions, to provide an overall "environmental setting." This will be published by the Museum as one of a number of volumes planned for Hesquiaht Harbour study.

 

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Title: A cultural analysis of faunal remains from three archaeological sites in Hesquiat Harbour B.C.

Year: 1980

Author(s): S.G. Calvert

Type: Academic Thesis

Description:
PhD University of British Columbia; lists remains of mammal species found in Hesquiat region; lists 6 marine species and 9 land species found in excavations; map of generalized distribution of mammal habitats; list of bird species found in Hesquiat regio

 

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Title: Meares Island Wildlife Inventory

Year: 1980

Author(s): R. T. McLaughlin

Type: Report (unpublished)

Description:
Summary: Wildlife inventories carried out on Meares island during February-June 1980 consisted of the following: 1. assessment of the status of black-tailed deer populations and winter habitat capabilities; 2. compilation of existing waterfowl data supplemented with additional winter and spring aerial surveys, and 3. identification of areas of importance to bald eagles.

 

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Title: A Cultural Analysis of Faunal Remains From Three Archaeological Sites in Hesquiat Harbour, BC

Year: 1980

Author(s): Sheila Gay Calvert

Type: Academic Thesis

Description:
This study examines the proposition that among the prehistoric hunter-gatherers of Hesquiat Harbour, west coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia, the geographical area exploited, and hence animal resource selection, was controlled by land use patterns limiting local groups to specific tracts of territory. It suggest that the interaction of the land use system with the environmental diversity of Hesquiat Harbour creates a sub-regional level of resource specialization recognizable in archaeological sites as variation in emphasis on animals from different habitats among the faunal assemblages. A specific proposition, developed from pertinent ethnographic and environmental information, relates land use patterns with a specific pattern of diversity among the faunal assemblages from three archaeological sites, DiSo 1, DiSo 9, and DiSo 16. The emphasis on different habitats one would expect to find at each site was predicted. The faunal assemblages, comprising 49,770 skeletal elements and 135,777.4 grams of shell, are described and compared, using relative frequency of skeletal element count and shell weight. The differences and similarities are discussed in relation to sampling and preservation factors, local environmental change, season of exploitation, change through time in material culture and habitats exploited. A statistically significant association of assemblages with different habitat emphases is found to account for the major proportion of the inter-assemblage variation. Observed patterns of habitat emphases are compared with those predicted. Actual emphases in the assemblages of DiSo 16 and DiSo 1 are positively correlated with the predicted patterns , but those of DiSo 9 differ. The differences are consistent with demonstrated local environmental change and a wider territory of exploitation. The analysis suggests that a simple, autonomous local group level of sociopolitical organization was present in Hesquiat Harbour at least 1,200 years ago and demonstrates that the natural environment defined by socio-cultural organizational factors is an important influence on regional faunal assemblage patterning on the Northwest Coast.

 

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Title: Meares Island Marine Biology Surveys

Year: 1980

Author(s): N. A. Sloan; M. J. Stanhope

Type: Report (unpublished)

Description:
Situation: Three foreshore areas around Meares Island indicated as potential development sites for log handling and storage by MacMillan Bloedel Limited. Estevan and Kennedy Lake Divisional engineering staffs were surveyed and herein assessed for their environmental concerns. Survey methods consisted of shore reconnaissance, diving subtidal reconnaissance and beach seinging at high or low tide. A combination of aerial and ground photographs, habitat-vegetation maps and beach seine yields are provided as evidence for environmental concerns at each site.

 

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Title: Steamer Cover: Marine Biology Report

Year: 1980

Author(s): N. A. Sloan

Type: Report (unpublished)

Description:
On July 2, 1980 a marine biological survey of Steamer Cove, Flores Island consisting of a dive, 2 low tide beach seines, shore sampling and habitat vegetation mapping was completed. This small cove is fringed with a rugged bedrock-bouder shore which has occasional pocket gravel beaches with seagrass beds on their lower shores. Noteworthy environmental concerns are firstly the seagrass beds which are well known and monitored herring spawn deposition sites and secondly, but less important, the rich clam populations in the lower portion of the gravel beaches.