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Your search for Management returned 875 records. Showing Records 751 to 780. Please Select a Record to View.

 

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Title: Lumber Firms' Returns May Diminish Soon

Year: 1988

Author(s): Patrick Durrant

Type: Newspaper Article

Description:
BC forest industry economics.

 

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Title: In the Chips

Year: 1988

Author(s): Michael Bernard

Type: Newspaper Article

Description:
"Unions and the provincial government want a greater share of the wealth [of forest companies] and environmentalists are demanding change."

 

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Title: The Forest and the Trees

Year: 1988

Author(s): Gordon Robinson

Type: Book

Description:
Part One is an anecdotal history of national forest management. In Part Two, Robinson describes "excellent forestry" -- uneven-aged management for sustained yield that safeguards the rich variety of life in the forest and protects all uses simultaneously. Part Three offers the readers a short course in the complex mathematics of forestry and provides guidelines for commenting on forest plans. In Part Four, Robison presents nearly 400 summaries of published research and expert opinions -- an invaluable resource for everyone interested in forest management.

 

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Title: The Sustainable Development of Regional Natural Resources in Clayoquot Sound: The Forest

Year: 1988

Author(s): William Wagner, Wild Land Wood Ltd.

Type: Report (unpublished)

Description:
None

 

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Title: From the Forest to the Sea: A story of fallen trees

Year: 1988

Type: Report (published)

Description:
Chapter 1: The forest portion of the ecosystem is the sum of three diverse, mutually dependent components: physical structures, biological entities, and ecological functions. These components are dynamic, continually developing diversity. Chapter 2: Explains how living and dead trees are linked together in the living machinery of a forest.

 

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Title: Don't Sit in Ottawa and Judge Us

Year: 1988

Type: Newspaper Article

Description:
none

 

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Title: Wilderness group advocates better logging practises

Year: 1988

Author(s): Paul George, Western Canada Wilderness Committee

Type: Newspaper Article

Description:
none

 

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Title: Protected Areas and the Boundary Model: Meares Island and Pacific Rim National Park

Year: 1988

Author(s): Philip Dearden

Type: Journal Article

Description:
Protected area systems are now established in many countries. In general, such systems are set up to provide for recreational enjoyment, stimulate educational and scientific interest, and conserve ecosystems in a pristine state. Substantial evidence now exists suggesting that conservation, in particular, is not necessarily being achieved by these areas. Machlis and Tichnell (1985) in their survey of the state of the world's parks document many examples. Others, such as Marion, Cole, and Bratton (1986), have discussed the impact of exotic vegetation on protected ecosystems; Stone (1986) has considered the influence of alien animals; Hendrix and Morehead (1983), Johnson and Carothers (1987), and Kushland (1987) have outlined some of the effects of hydrological changes outside parks on ecosystems within parks; and Peterson et al (1987) have recently documented apparent reductions in tree growth in parks as a result of ozone depletion. These are not isolated cases. Many similar observations exist. An ex post facto theory behind these observations suggests that perceptions of protected area boundaries, and the role they play in management decisions, are the underlying reason for these failures. The purpose of this paper is to discuss and extentd the boundary model of Schonewald-Cox and Bayless (1986) and to present a case study to test a trans-boundary interaction relating to recreational values.

 

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Title: Effects of intensive forest management on breeding birds of Vancouver Island. Problem Analysis.

Year: 1988

Author(s): K.L. Sadoway

Type: Government document

Description:
This publication is one of three companion publications resulting from a problem analysis on the effects of intensive forest management on non-ungulate wildlife of Vancouver Island. Non-ungulate species include all amphibian, reptile, bird, and mammal (excluding deer and elk) species that occur on Vancouver Island.

 

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Title: Letter to the Editor - Adrian Dorst

Year: 1988

Author(s): Adrian Dorst

Type: Newspaper Article

Description:
None

 

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Title: M&B Playing Defense

Year: 1988

Author(s): Shawna Mckeever

Type: Newspaper Article

Description:
None

 

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Title: Suzuki Foundation Wild Salmon Conference Transcript - Simon Lucas' remarks

Year: 1988

Author(s): Simon Lucas, B.C. Aboriginal Fisheries Commission and Nuu-Chah-Nulth Tribal Council

Type: Newspaper Article

Description:
None

 

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Title: [Miscellaneous reference documents, from the files of Mike Mullin: Aquaculture and fisheries; Biological diversity; Sustainable development]

Year: 1987

Author(s): [Various]

Type: Miscellaneous Notes

Description:
Volume one: Aquaculture and fisheries. Includes: records of meetings; "Pacific Tidings" journal; documents from Nootka Coastal Resource Interests Study; approx. 40 pp. total. Volume two: Biological diversity. Includes: Clayoquot Sound Biological Diversity Study; "Conserving Biological Diversity: A Decision-Maker's Guide;" 4 pp. total. Volume three: Sustainable development. Includes: general sustainable development criteria; "Planning Sustainable Communities;" "In Sesarch of Sustainable Devleopment: New Zealand's Restructured Environmental Management System;" "Towards a Sustainable Future: Report of the New Democratic Task Force on the Environment;" and more; approx. 50 pp. total.

 

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Title: [Resource Documents from the District of Tofino files: Forest Management]

Year: 1987

Author(s): [Various]

Type: Committee File

Description:
Includes: "An American Experience" (Washington State Department of Natural Resources); "New Perspectives for Watershed Management;" "The Role of Participatory Democracy in Forest Management;" "Old Growth Strategy Project: management practices team;" others. Approx. 100 pp.

 

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Title: Our Wildlife Heritage: 100 Years of Wildlife Management

Year: 1987

Type: Book

 

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Title: Mycorrhizae, mycorrhizopheres, and reforestation: current knowledge and research needs

Year: 1987

Author(s): R. Molina; D. A. Perry; M. P. Amaranthus

Type: Journal Article

Description:
Mycorrhizae and forest management/practices.

 

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Title: Our Wildlife Heritage

Year: 1987

Type: Book

Description:
From the back cover:" Wild creatures and their living space have been of both interest and concern for all recorded history. The concept of of conservation and a conservation "ethic" is, however, a quite recent phenomenon, dating back to the first decade of this century..."

 

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Title: Mycorrhizae, mycorrhizospheres, and reforestation: current knowledge and research needs

Year: 1987

Author(s): D.A. Perry, Oregan State University; R. Molina; M.P. Amaranthus

Type: Journal Article

Description:
Although not a panacea, management of mycorrhizae and associated organism is an important reforestation aid. Its three major components are protection of the indigenous soil community and evaluation of inoculation need, integration of inoculation programs into existing reforestation technology, and research. Clear-cutting frequently results in reduced mycorrhizae formation, particularly when reforestation is delayed and no other host plants are present to maintain fungal populations. Implications of such reductions for reforestation vary with environmental factors and tree species. Adequate mycorrhiza formation is especially critical for ectomycorrhizal trees growing on poor soils or in environments where seedlings must establish quickly to survive. It may also be important where early successional, noncrop plants do not support the same mycobiont as the crop. In such circumstances, a self-reinforcing trend may develop, with poor mycorrhiza formation reducing seedling survival and poor tree stocking leading to further loss of mycorrhizal inocula. Inoculating nursery seedlings with mycobionts holds promise for improving outplanting performance only if site-adapted fungi are used. A practical alternative is to improve nursery practices to enhance natural populations of mycorrhizal fungi. Seedlings leaving the nursery with diverse mycorrhizae may perform better than those leaving with only one or a few nursery-adapted types.

 

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Title: BC's Vanishing Temperate Rainforests

Year: 1987

Author(s): Cameron Young

Type: Journal Article

Description:
none

 

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Title: Silvicultural Alternatives for the Management of Unstable Sites in the Queen Charlotte Islands: A Literature Review and Recommendations

Year: 1986

Author(s): BC Ministry of Forests

Type: Report (published)

 

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Title: Effects of Intensive Forest Management on Amphibians and Reptiles of Vancouver Island

Year: 1986

Author(s): K. L. Sadoway

Type: Report (published)

Description:
Introduction: Amphibians and reptiles are cryptic animals and generally go unnoticed. Of the 19 amphibians and 18 reptile species known to occur in British Columbia, nine amphibian and seven reptile species are indigenous to Vancouver Island. An additional three amphibian species have been introduced to the island. The economic importance of these animals is linked largely to the pet trade. Amphibians are extensively used for biological research and frog legs continue to be a popular gastronomic fare in eastern Canada and the USA. The market demand for snakeskin leather is also increasing. Ecologically, amphibians are an important food source for a variety of fish, reptiles, birds and mammals. The amphibians' role in controlling forest insect pests has been stated; however, the extent of this role and its economic value have not been studied. Reptiles play the role of both predator and prey. In this analysis on the effects of intensive forest management on amphibians and reptiles, only indigenous species will be discussed in detail. Information on the three introduced amphibian species is limited to species distibution and its potential effects on indigenous species.

 

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Title: Effects of intensive forest management on non-ungulate mammals of Vancouver Island.Problem Analysis.

Year: 1986

Author(s): K.L. Sadowy

Type: Government document

Description:
This publication is one of three companion publications resulting from the problem analysis on "The effects of intensive forest management on non-ungulate wildlife of Vancouver Island". Non-ungulate species include all amphibian, reptile, bird, and mammal (excluding deer and elk) species that occur on Vancouver Island.

 

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Title: Canada's vanishing forests

Year: 1985

Type: Journal Article

 

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Title: Canada's vanishing forests

Year: 1985

Type: Journal Article

 

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Title: Annotated Bibliography on Forest-Range Ecosystem in the Pacific Northwest

Year: 1985

Author(s): Lance O. Nordstrom

Type: Report (published)