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Your search for Management returned 875 records. Showing Records 776 to 805. Please Select a Record to View.

 

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Title: Soils of Southern Vancouver Island

Year: 1985

Author(s): J. R. Jungen

Type: Report (published)

Description:
"Soils and their suitability for various purposes form an integral part of making decisions in land-use planning and management. A reconnaissance soil survey of Southern Vancouver Island (all or parts of NTS map sheets 92B, 92C, 92F, 92G and 92K) was undertaken between 1974 and 1976 to provide basic soils and biophysical information useful for a broad range of intepretations."

 

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Title: The Ecology of Natural Disturbance and Patch Dynamics

Year: 1985

Type: Book

Description:
"Ecologists have always been aware of the importance of natural dynamics in ecosystems, but historically, the focus has been on successional development of equilibrium communities. While this approach has generated appreciable understanding of the composition and functioning of ecosystems, recently many workers have turned their attention to processes of disturbance themselves and to the evolutionary significance of such events. This shifted emphasis has inspired studies in diverse systems. We use the phrase "patch dynamics: to describe their common focus."

 

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Title: Enhancing the Establishment and Growth of Arboreal Forage Lichens in Intensively Managed Forests

Year: 1985

Author(s): S. K. Stevenson

Type: Report (published)

Description:
Arboreal lichens of the genera Alectoria, Bryoria and perhaps Usnea, are a major winter forage item for black-tailed deer on Vancouver Island. Those lichens grow in the forest canopy and are most commonly available to the deer as litterfall on the forest floor. Availability of lichen litterfall is one of the several key habitat features of old-growth stands that area used by black-tailed deer as winter range. Managers responsible for integrating intensive forestry and wildlife management on Vancouver Island seek means by which forestry practices can be used to create suitable winter habitat for black-tailed deer in second-growth stands. The abundance of arboreal lichens in immature timber stands is characteristically low. It is the purpose of this problem analysis to explore the factors that may be acting to limit the abundance of arboreal lichens in young stands, and to identify experimental techniques and management practices that might enhance the establishment and growth of forage lichens in second growth.

 

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Title: Intensive forestry effects on Vancouver Island deer and elk habitats. Problem Analysis.

Year: 1985

Author(s): J.B. Nyberg

Type: Government document

Description:
This problem analysis was requested by the Technical Working Group directing the integrated Wildlife - Intensive Forestry research program on Vancouver Island. Its goal is to evaluate research priorities concerning the ways in which intensive forest management will affect habitat values for deer and elk. Other studies will focus on the ways these animals use their habitats e.g. habitat selection and population responses), and will be coordinated with the forestry/habitat investigations that will follow from this problem analysis.

 

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Title: Forest crowns, snow interception and management of black-tailed deer winter habitat.

Year: 1985

Author(s): R.S. McNay

Type: Government document

Description:
The phenomenon of snow interception by forest stands is examined. Interception relationships extracted from literature are evaluated for their applicability to the silvicultural and climatic conditions of south coastal British Columbia. Hypothesis tested address: 1) the prediction of snow interception, 2) comparisons of heterogeneity in snow interception between second-growth and old-growth forests, and 3) how interception and interception efficiency vary depending on forest crown completeness and storm size. General relationships regarding snow interception under continental conditions were found to hold in coastal conditions, but relationships between crown completeness and interception were weak. Storm size and melt are identifies as confounding factors in making predictions about snow inerception based on stand crown completeness.

 

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Title: Interactions between black-tailed deer and intensive forest management

Year: 1985

Author(s): R.S. McNay; R. Davies

Type: Government document

Description:
This problem analysis was requested by the Technical Working Group (TWG) directing the Integrated Wildlife-Intensive Forestry Research (IWIFR) program on Vancouver Island. It deals specifically with the ways that intensive forestry treatments modify the manner in which Columbian black-tailed deer select, use, and respond to various habitats. The objectives are: to define the problems associated with interactions between deer and intensive forestry; to review present knowledge about the problem and to identify information gaps related to it; to identify research topics; to suggest priorities for research; and to recommend approaches to high priority topics.

 

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Title: Site diagnosis, tree species selection, and slashburning guidelines for the Vancouver Forest Region.

Year: 1984

Author(s): R N Green

Type: Report (published)

 

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Title: Gabion Evaluation for Salmonid Enhancement in a Landslide Impacted Stream on the Queen Charlotte Islands, British Columbia

Year: 1984

Author(s): Herbert D. Klassen

Type: Report (published)

Description:
"This paper may be of interest to foresters, fish biologists, and fisheries managers alike. The major purpose of the paper was to evaluate one method of rehabilitation of a debris-torrented stream, with respect to fish production. Guidelines for the gabion installation were included, as was a benefit-cost analysis." Paper of the Fish Forestry Interaction Program.

 

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Title: Applied Forest Tree Improvement

Year: 1984

Author(s): Bruce Zobel; John T. Talbert

Type: Book

Description:
A detailed guide on how to effectively organize, implement and manage large scale tree-improvement programs.

 

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Title: The Seen and Unseen World of the Fallen Tree

Year: 1984

Type: Report (published)

Description:
Large, fallen trees in various stages of decay contribute much-needed diversity to terrestrial and aquatic habitats in western forests. When most biological activity in soil is limited by low moisture availability in summer, the fallen tree-soil interface offers a relatively cool, moist habitat for animals and a substrate for microbial and root activity. Intensified utilization and management can deprive future forests of large, fallen trees. The impact of this loss on habitat diversity and on long-term forest productivity must be determined because managers need sound information on which to base resource management decisions.

 

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Title: Forever Green

Year: 1983

Author(s): Hector Allan Richmond

Type: Book

Description:
Forever Green documents Hector Richmond's long career as one of Canada's foremost entomologists. The author combines entertaining autobiography with a candid examination of the history and evolution of the forest industry in Canada.

 

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Title: Benefit-cost analysis of a sockeye salmon (oncorhynchus nerka) hatchery on the Nahmint River, British Columbia

Year: 1982

Author(s): Bruce White

Type: Academic Thesis

Description:
This thesis examines hatchery enhancement of sockeye stocks.

 

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Title: Problem Analysis: Old Growth and Ungulates of Northern Vancouver island

Year: 1982

Author(s): Ministry of Forests; Ministry of Environment

Type: Report (unpublished)

Description:
"Traditional timber harvest patterns on northern Vancouver Island have reduced the areas of old growth to the extent that deer and elk populations will be severely affected in a critical winter." Demand for both timber and wildlife "cannot be met to the degree that the proponents of each resource would prefer, and some reduction in wildlife recreation or timber harvesting is essential." These statements are included in the introduction to a one-year program, aimed at identifying various production levels of both timber and wildlife on northern Vancouver Island and released today from the ministries of Forests and Environment. The program proposal establishes terms of reference for the analysis and gives a comprehensive background to the difficult resource decisions which must soon be made between timber and wildlife on northern Vancouver Island. The procedure by which both resources will be analyzed and the various management options determine dis detailed, and a schedule for analysis and presentation of results is given.

 

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Title: Ecosystems of MacMillan Park on Vancouver Island

Year: 1982

Author(s): A. E. Inselberg; K. Klinka; C. Ray

Type: Report (published)

Description:
This report gives the results of a synecological study carried out in MacMillan Park on Vancouver Island, an area approximately 90 hectares that features a striking old growth forst of Douglas-fir, western hemlock, western redcedar and grand fir once common on similar habitats throughout the British Columbia Lower Mainland and Vancouver Island before the onset of loggin. The study is done in accordance with the ecosystem classification methods used by the Ministry of Forests in the Vancouver Forest Region and is one of the most detailed ecological studies undertaken to date in the region. Techniques of ecological analysis at levels of the biogeocoenotic association, type and variation are described with emphasis on floristic structure and composition. Ten associations are identified and subdivided, where apprpriate, into types and variations. General and specific intperpretations of the units are given, with the aim of providing an understanding of the forest ecosystems in order that management practices can be devised which will preserve the integrity of the park and enhance the recreational activities associated with it. A detailed ecosystem map at the scale of 1:2500 supplements the report. The map outlines associations, generalized classes of forest and shrub cover, as well as recreational values. The recreation values are intended to make the map more readily useful for the purposes of managemenet activities.

 

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Title: Predator-Ungulate Relationships In Second Growth Forests On Vancouver Island. Problem Analysis.

Year: 1982

Author(s): Ian Hatter

Type: Government document

Description:
The effects and influences of predation on ungulates are reviewed. Predation is a significant source of mortality and influences the distribution and habitat selection of native ungulates. Predation effects and influences on Vancouver Island deer and elk are reviewed and contrasted with those of the rest of North America. Predation on deer is particularly severe due to high wolf population densities and the probable additive effects of cougar and bear predation and human deer harvests. Wolves probably indluence seasonal movements and habitat selection of deer and elk but the available information is inconclusive. The potential effects and influences of wolf predation on ungulate populations in second growth forests is high. It presents a major confounding factor in interpreting deer and elk habitat utilization, animal condition, and population parameters. However, it is suggested that wolves should not be viewed as a confounding influence on intensive wildlife intensive forestry management but as an integral component of a managed predator-ungulate-habitat system. Specific problems and unknowns of predation are also identified. It is recommended that predation studies be implemented immediately.

 

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Title: [Miscelleneous Forestry Resource Documents form the District of Tofino files: forestry in New Zealand]

Year: 1980

Author(s): [Various]

Type: Report (unpublished)

Description:
Three documents: "What's New in Forest Research?" no. 13, 1984; "Silvicultural Management of the Rimu Forests of South Westland," Forest Reseasrch Institute Bulletin no. 121, 1987; "Structure and Growth of Dense Podocarp Forest at Tihoi, Central North Island, and the Impact of Selective Logging," New Zealand Journal of Forestry, 225 (1): 44-57, 1980.

 

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Title: Importance of organic debris dams in the structure and function of stream ecosystems.

Year: 1980

Author(s): R E Bilby

Type: Journal Article

 

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Title: Timing of Herring Spawnings in British Columbia, 1942-1979

Year: 1980

Author(s): A. S. Hourston

Type: Journal Article

Description:
The date of first and last spawnings and the dates when spawning was 10, 25, 50, 75, and 90% completed are tabulated, along with the duration of spawning and the abundance of egg deposition for 110 management units on the BC coast for each year since 1942 that data are available.

 

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Title: Meares Island, Clayoquot Sound

Year: 1980

Author(s): Friends of Clayoquot Sound

Type: Report (unpublished)

Description:
None

 

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Title: Catalogue of Salmon Streams and Spawning Escapements of Statistical Area 24 (Clayoquot Sound)

Year: 1979

Author(s): R. F. Brown; M. J. Comfort; D. E. Marshall

Type: Report (published)

Description:
Catalogue containing each stream's location, spawning distribution, barriers and points of difficult ascent, escapement records and other general data pertaining to the stream. The catalogue also includes a topographical map of the stream's location and in some cases a sketch which further describes the surrounding area.

 

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Title: The Growth of Douglas-Fir, Western Red Cedar, Western Hemlock and Amabilis Fir on Moderately Well-Drained Clay Soils on the Tofino-Ucluelet Lowlands.

Year: 1978

Author(s): Steve Lord

Type: Report (unpublished)

Description:
The suitability of the flat-lying area adjacent to the ocean between Ucluelet and Tofino to grow various species of commercial trees has been a source of debate since reforestation programs were initiatied in the area in the late 1950s. Since most of the old growth stands on the "flats" have been logged, the question of which species to plan for a second crop has for the time being been resolved. However, as stand managemenet practises are intensified on the older plantations and naturally regenerated areas, additional information on the factors affecting site productivity and how they can be altered by management practises, is necessary in order to maximize the production of high quality fibre from these sites. The original objectives of the study were to analyze the growth rates and patterns of the various commercial tree species on all sites on the flats from the most productive to the least productive. As they study progressed it became apparent that there was a lack of suitable sampling areas on the low productivity, poorly drained sites. As a result, the selection of sample sites was limited to the most rapidly drained, most productive sites which contained a good selection of sample trees over 10 years old for all species. All of the growth data and stem quality data presented in teh write-up of this study is from one site, having similar potential productivity, soils and vegetation. Observations on the growth patterns and management implications of the lower productivity sites have been made in this report; however, it should be emphasized that they have not been substantiated by the collection of suitable data.

 

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Title: Remote Sensing and Ecosystem Management

Year: 1977

Author(s): D.M. Lavigne; N. A. Oritsland; A Falconer

Type: Report (published)

 

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Title: Cleland Island Ecological Reserve

Year: 1976

Author(s): R. George; D. Clark

Type: Paper

Description:
First paragraph: Cleland Island is the outermost island in Clayoquot Sound on the western shore of Vancouver Island. It has a land area of 19 acres with dimensions approximately 200 yards by 400 yards and a maximum elevation of approximately 60 feet. The island has been protected as a wildlife refuge for some years and was established as the first Ecological Reserve in British Columbia in May 1971. These actions were undertaken to protect the island in recognition of its importance as a seabird nesting and colony site. The island is the site of a number of continuing studies of indigenous seabirds.

 

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Title: The major soils of the Tofino area of Vancouver Island and implications for land use planning and management

Year: 1974

Author(s): T.E. Baker

Type: Academic Thesis

Description:
PhD University of British Columbia

 

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Title: Toquart Watershed Integrated Resource Study

Year: 1974

Author(s): Ted E. Baker; J. Brian Nyberg

Type: Report (unpublished)

Description:
An integrated resource system for planning and management was developed by representatives from federal and provincial agencies and the University of British Columbia. The system is intended for use as a model for future integrated resources studies in the Vancouver Forest District. The study group proposed that an interagency resource group be permanently established to conduct similar studies on a routine basis. The areas to be studied would be selected by the participating agencies. A sequence for conducting inventories is given to eliminate duplication and provide maximum benefit for each subsequent inventory. Levels of detail and data format are also discussed. The interagency resource group would also be responsible for providing recommendations for development based on the acquired information. These recommendations would be periodically reviewed and updated. The implementation of the recommendations would be the responsibility of the agencies now responsible for the individual resources. Additional proposals are made aimed at improving the system during future studies.