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Your search for Plant species returned 44 records. Showing Records 26 to 44 . Please Select a Record to View.

 

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Title: Application for Ecological Reserve: Hesquiat Lake

Year: 1982

Author(s): R. Ogilvie; A. Ceska; O. Ceska

Type: Government document

Description:
none

 

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Title: Vegetation Units of the Hesquiat Harbour Area 1981-05-21

Year: 1981

Author(s): Andrew Harcombe

Type: Report (published)

Description:
Introduction: The vegetation study was requested by the Archaeology Division of the British Columbia Provincial Museum, which is presently involved in a large archaeological study of the Hesquiat Harbour area, at the request of the Hesquiat Cultural Committee of the Hesquiat Indian Band. This report describes and maps the vegetation of the Hesquiat Harbour area. Hesquiat Harbour is located on the outer west coast of Vancouver Island, near Estevan POint. The specific study area includes the Hesquiat Peninsula and lower elevation areas bordering Hesquiat Harbour. The information contained within the vegetation report will later be incorporated into a larger report, with a discussion of quaternary history, terrain descriptions, soil descriptions, and faunal descriptions, to provide an overall "environmental setting." This will be published by the Museum as one of a number of volumes planned for Hesquiaht Harbour study.

 

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Title: Distinctive Features of the Northwestern Coniferous Forest: Development, Structure and Function

Year: 1980

Author(s): Jerry F. Franklin; Richard H. Waring

Type: Book Chapter

Description:
none

 

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Title: The Soil landscapes of British Columbia

Year: 1978

Author(s): K.W.G. Valentine; Ministry of Environment British Columbia, Resource Analysis

Type: Book

Description:
For a number of years now those of us working with soils in British Columbia have been approached with such questions as "Where can I get a book on Soils?" or "is there a book on the soils of British Columbia. The problem was that people like foresters or engineers were trying to use soil survey reports and maps with no background information other than that which could be extracted from the very technical manual of the Canadian Systems of Soil Classification.

 

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Title: Cleland Island Ecological Reserve

Year: 1976

Author(s): R. George; D. Clark

Type: Paper

Description:
First paragraph: Cleland Island is the outermost island in Clayoquot Sound on the western shore of Vancouver Island. It has a land area of 19 acres with dimensions approximately 200 yards by 400 yards and a maximum elevation of approximately 60 feet. The island has been protected as a wildlife refuge for some years and was established as the first Ecological Reserve in British Columbia in May 1971. These actions were undertaken to protect the island in recognition of its importance as a seabird nesting and colony site. The island is the site of a number of continuing studies of indigenous seabirds.

 

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Title: Application for Ecological Reserve: Megin River

Year: 1975

Author(s): Jim Pojar; Hans L. Roemer

Type: Report (unpublished)

Description:
none

 

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Title: Reproductive dynamics of four plant communities of southwestern British Columbia

Year: 1974

Author(s): Jim Pojar

Type: Journal Article

Description:
A study of angiosperm reproductive biology was made in four plant communities in southwestern British Columbia. Species of all four communities have staggered, peak flowing times, resulting in phenological spectra. Anemophily is the major mode of pollination in a salt marsh, while entomophily predominates in a subalpine meadow. Two sphagnum bogs have more of a balance between wind and insect pollination. There are corresponding differences in the proportions of showy-flowered species in the communities. It is proposed that interspecific competition has greatly influences the evolution of both species and community flowering strategies. Biotic seed dispersal prevails in the salt march and bogs, while most of the subalpine meadow species are wind-dispersed. Species and community modes of disperal depend on the nature of the vegetation and the relative availability of dispersal vectors, as well as on diaspore morphology. Although vegetation reproduction and self-compatability are fairly common, the bulk of the flora and vegetation at all four sites has breeding systems promoting outcrossing. There is little evidence that the physical environments of these communities, all harsh in at least some respects, have selectively favored autogamous or agamosphermous species.

 

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Title: Pacific Coast Tree Finder

Year: 1973

Author(s): Tom Watt

Type: Book

Description:
Pocket tree-identification book.

 

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Title: Flora and Vegetation of Pacific Rim National Park: Phase 1, Long Beach

Year: 1972

Author(s): Marcus A. M. Bell

Type: Report (unpublished)

Description:
Three hundred and thirty eight vascular plant species comprising 198 genera and 69 families occur in the park, including 67 introductions. One hundred and twenty-six species are abundant and wide-spread, 185 rare to sparsely distributed, and 27 very rare within the park, including Habenaria chorisiana, Mecodium wrightii, and Crepis Nicaeensis. Bryophytes comprise a large part of the vegetation. A partial list of 147 mosses, 57 hepatics and 24 lichens is provided. All vascular plants are annotated for distribution and habitats within the park, flowering period, and other features as appropriate. Species are further related to the plant communities in which they occur, in order to maximize information on species ecology. Fourtenn major plant communities are defined on the basis of dominant vegetation and land form, and two on the basis of history of disturbance. Thirty nine tentative subcommities are briefly described. The five forested communities are dominated by one or more of sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis), western red cedar (Thuja plicata), western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla), lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta), amabilis fir (Abies amabilis), and Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii). Two non-forested communities are on logged or other disturbed areas characterized by species which reflect more the history of disturbance and land use than natural site conditions. Seven non-forested communities are respectivly dominated by Sphagnum spp., yellow pond lily (Nupha polysepalum), woolly cinquefoiil (Potentilla villosa), beach ryegrass (Elymus mollis), mace-headed sedge (Carex macrocephala), tufted hairgrass (Deschampsia cespitosa), and eelgrass (Zostera marina). A summary chart for differentiating community types is provided, based on species composition and environmental features. The main environmental factors influencing vegtation pattern is undisturbed areas appear to be parent material, soil moisture conditions, and oceanic influences. Four representative soil types are discussed and related to community distribution. Podzolization and gleization are dominant soil processes in this area.

 

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Title: List of plants rare within the boundaries of Phase I, Pacific Rim National Park

Year: 1972

Author(s): M.A.M. Bell

Type: Report (unpublished)

Description:
none

 

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Title: Levels of polyploidy in four vegetation types of southwestern British Columbia

Year: 1972

Author(s): Jim Pojar

Type: Journal Article

Description:
Chromosome counts were made for the angiosperm species of five sample sites representative of four vegetation types in southwestern British Columbia. Levels of polyploidy were calculated for both the flora and vegetation of each of the sites. It is proposed that the differences in polyploid levels between the sites are related primarily to the increased likelihood of formation and selective advantage of allopolyploids in chronically unpredictable physical environments.

 

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Title: Species mentioned in George Nicholson's Vancouver Island's West Coast 1762-1962

Year: 1971

Author(s): George Nicholson

Type: Miscellaneous Notes

Description:
Notes from George Nicholson's Vancouver Island's West Coast, 1762-1962. List of animal species and other natural history notes from this book.

 

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Title: Plant associations and succession in the vegetation of the sand dunes of Long Beach Vancouver Island

Year: 1965

Author(s): R.T. Kuramoto

Type: Academic Thesis

Description:
MSc University of British Columbia; adaptations of plants on sand dunes; distribution of plant communities; successional trends of vegetation; gives plant species; M.Sc. Thesis

 

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Title: Vegetation and History of the Sphagnum Bogs of the Tofino Area, Vancouver Island

Year: 1965

Author(s): Leslie Keith Wade

Type: Academic Thesis

Description:
The Sphagnum bogs of the Tofino-Ucluelet area of the western coast of Vancouver Island were studied from vegetational, edaphic, and historical aspects. An intergrated approach to these three aspects was attempted in order to give in a relatively limited time as complete a picture as possible of the bog ecosystem. The bog vegetation was studied on 110 sample plots using analytical and synthetic methods of the Zurich-Montpellier school of phytosociology. Ten different vegetation types were described and characterized, nine belong to the bog ecosystem and one to the surrounding scrub forest. The nine bog vegetation types consist of five distinct associations and one association composed of five variants.

 

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Title: Plant Associations and Succession in the Vegetation of The Sand Dunes of Long Beach, Vancouver Island

Year: 1963

Author(s): Richard Tatsuo Kuramoto

Type: Academic Thesis

Description:
The vegetation of the sand dunes of Long Beach, Vancouver Island, was studied on 116 sample plots. The purpose of this study was to describe the floristic and edaphic characteristics of the plant associations, to determine the major environmental factors controlling the distribution of the plant communities and to study the successional trends of the vegetation. The vegetation was described using the analytical and synthetical methods of the Zurich-Montpellier school of phytosociology. This thesis describes seven plant associations and four variants. The vegetation units are as follows: A. Foreshore habitats 1. Cakiletum edentulae, B. Blowout habitats 2. Poetum macranthae a. poosum macranthae b. abroniosum latifoliae, 3. Arctostaphyleto-Rhacomitrietum canescentis C. Habitats of the mobile dune ridge 4. Elymetum vancouverensis a. ammophilosum arenariae b. elymosum vancouverensis D. Habitats of the dune slack and stable dune ridge 5. Aireto-Ceratodontetum purpurei 6. Arctostaphyleto-Eurhynchietum oregani 7. Hetergenous communities in moist dune slack habitats E. The dune forest habitat 8. Piceeto-Gaultherieto-Maianthemetum dialatati Important environmental factors which control the distribution of these associations are the level of winter and storm tides, wind, the amount of sand burial and blowout that occurs in the habitat and the amount of available soil water. The first stages of succession begins in the unstable habitats of the Elymetum vancouverensis and Poetum macranthae. With stabilization of the habitat, these associations are suceeded by the Aireto-Ceratodontetum purpurei and the Arctostaphyletum-Eurhynchietum oregani in exposed habitats and the Arctostaphyleto-Rhacomitrietum canescentis in habitats well protected from wind. All vegetation eventually reaches the climax Piceeto-Gaultherieto-Maianthemetum dilatati.

 

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Title: Natural history observations in the Clayoquot River Watershed, Vancouver Island, 1992-1997

Year: n.d.

Author(s): David Pitt-Brooke; Clayoquot Biosphere Project

Type: Journal Article

Description:
The Clayoquot Valley Natural History program was intended to generate year-round observations of natural history events across a broad range of habitats in the Clayoquot River Valley, in order to provide regular, longer-term monitoring of the watershed.

 

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Title: Rare Plants in Pacific Rim National Park

Year: n.d.

Author(s): Barry Campbell

Type: Other

Description:
None

 

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Title: Clayoquot/Kennedy Limestone Area: List of Plant Species

Year: n.d.

Type: Government document

Description:
none

 

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Title: Plants of Pacific Rim National Park

Year: n.d.

Type: Report (unpublished)

Description:
none