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Your search for Salmon returned 170 records. Showing Records 126 to 155. Please Select a Record to View.

 

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Title: Catalogue of Major Salmon-Producing Rivers of Clayoquot Sound, 1953-1994

Year: 1994

Author(s): Dept. of Fisheries and Oceans

Type: Report (unpublished)

Description:
none

 

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Title: Phenotypic Divergence of Sea-ranched, Farmed, and Wild Salmon

Year: 1994

Author(s): Ian A. Fleming, Norwegian Institute of Nature Research; Mart R. Gross, University of Toronto; Bror Jonsson, Norwegian Institute of Nature Research

Type: Journal Article

Description:
We quantified divergence in phenotype of sea-ranched, farmed, and wild Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) of a common genetic stock (River Isma, Norway). These first-generation fish were also contrasted with a fifth-generation farmed population (Norwegian commercial strain) and with wild and multigeneration sea-ranched populations of coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch). In comparisons using mature Atlantic salmon male parr, cultured juveniles had smaller heads and fins and narrower caudal peduncles and could be distinguished from wild juveniles with 100% accuracy. When juveniles were reared to adulthood in the natural marine environment, some environmentally induced differences due to juvenile hatchery rearing persisted by many disappeared. This was particularly true for head and trunk morphology. Greater adult divergence from the wild state was observed in multigeneration sea-ranched coho salmon, suggesting that evolutionary changes may accumulate with time. Continued farming of salmon juveniles through adulthood increased environmentally induced phenotypic divergence considerably. Both rayed-fn sizes and body streamlining decreased. Fifth-generation Norwegian farmed salmon showed the greatest morphological differences. Both the proportion of a fish's life history and number of generations spent in culture are thus probably important determinants of phenotypic divergence of cultured fish from their wild state.

 

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Title: Local Fisheries Co-management: A Review of International Experiences and Their Implications for Salmon Management in BC

Year: 1994

Author(s): Evelyn W. Pinkerton

Type: Journal Article

Description:
The theory and practice of community-based self-management and government-community co-management is examined in terms of the potential of these management systems to address some of the major biological, economic, and political problems of the salmon fishery of BC, Canada. Many of the elements of success of both arrangements and processes are likely to apply to a broad range of fisheries co-management solutions.

 

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Title: Workshop Report of the Kennedy Lake Salmonid Technical Working Group, March 10-11, 1994, Tofino

Year: 1994

Author(s): Daniel Bouillon; D.R. Marmorek

Type: Report (published)

Description:
From page 1:"This report describes the results of the third workshop of the Kennedy Lake Technical Working Group, held in Tofino March 10-11, 1994.

 

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Title: Clayoquot Lake and Upper Clayoquot River Spawner Enumeration 24-27 November, 1993

Year: 1993

Author(s): Mike Morrell

Type: Report (unpublished)

Description:
None

 

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Title: Breeding Success of Hatchery and Wild Coho Salmon (Oncorhynchus Kisutch) in Competition

Year: 1993

Author(s): Ian A. Fleming; Mart R. Gorss; Mart R. Gross

Type: Journal Article

Description:
The divergence of hatchery fish in traits important for reproductive success has raised concerns about their ability to rehabilitate wild populations, and the threat that their inevitable straying poses to biological diversity through introgression. We therefore undertook a study of the breeding competition and success of sea-ranched hatchery fish placed in direct competition with wild fish. Experiments using wild and hatchery coho salmon (Oncorhynchus Kisutch) were conducted within a controlled stream channel, allowing selective manipulation of breeding competition and density. Hatchery fish, particularly males, were competitively inferior to wild fish, being less aggressive and more submissive. These results imply that hatchery fish have restricted abilities to rehabilitate wild populations, and may pose ecological and genetic threats to the conservation of wild populations.

 

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Title: Kennedy Lake Technical Working Group: Synthesis of Current Understanding

Year: 1993

Type: Report (published)

Description:
This report describes the results of a workshop on Kennedy Lake sockeye stocks. The workshop represents the first step in a long project designed to rebuild Kennedy Lake sockeye stocks to levels that can again sustain a healthy native fishery. In addition, the project will start to accumulate the information needed to manage these stocks sustainably.

 

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Title: Upper Clayoquot River

Year: 1993

Author(s): Mike Morrell; Wendy Kotilla

Type: Report (unpublished)

Description:
none

 

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Title: Reproductive behavior of hatchery and wild coho salmon (Oncorhynchus Kisutch): does it differ?

Year: 1992

Author(s): Ian A. Fleming; Mart R. Gross

Type: Journal Article

Description:
We report an experimental study that contrasts the reproductive behavior of wild to hatchery coho salmon (Oncorhynchus Kisutch). Three variables significantly influenced reproductive behavior and breeding success: (1) competition; (2) body weight; and (3) hatchery versus wild origin. In the absence of competition, both hatchery and wild fish bred readily. However, competition delayed spawning, reduced nest numbers, increased body wounding, increased egg loss through retention and nest superimposition, and increased variance in breeding success. Body weight was an important determinant of success in the competitive environment. Hatchery females has larger egg masses but smaller fecundities than wild females due to their larger egg size. These results imply significant differences in the reproductive potential of hatchery relative to wild fish during competition.

 

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Title: Distribution, abundance, and habitat of prey fish on the west coast of Vancouver Island

Year: 1991

Author(s): Douglas Hay; Michael Healey; Daniel Ware; Norman Wilimovsky

Type: Proceedings

Description:
Abstract: The distribution, abundance and habitat of the major fish species on the west coast of Vancouver Island are reviewed in the context of availability to seabirds. pp22-29.

 

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Title: Benthic Impacts of Salmon Farming in British Columbia

Year: 1990

Author(s): Stephen F. Cross, Aquametrix Research Ltd.

Type: Report (unpublished)

Description:
"A comprehensive study was implemented to assess the benthis impacts of salmon farming in British Columbia. The eight farm sites employed in this study were situated in areas representative of the wide range of physical oceanographic conditions in order to document the variation in environmental impacts associated with finfish aquaculture operations on this coast."

 

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Title: Latitudinal Clines: A trade-off between egg number and size in pacific salmon

Year: 1990

Author(s): Ian A. Fleming; Mart R. Gross

Type: Journal Article

Description:
The latitudinal variation in clutch size found in many animal species, including Pacific salmon, has been an enigmatic problem in ecology. We analyze egg number and egg size of 17 populations of coho salmon (Oncorhynchus Kisutch)distributed over a latitudinal gradient in North America. These populations have a significant latitudinal increase in their egg number. But this increase is accompanied by a significant latitudinal decrease in their egg size. The total biomass of eggs produced also declines with latitude.

 

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Title: Natural Selection Resulting from Female Breeding Competition in a Pacific Salmon (coho: Oncorhynchus Kisutch)

Year: 1989

Author(s): Eric P. van der Berghe; Mart R. Gross

Type: Journal Article

Description:
We studied breeding competition among wild female coho salmon (Oncorhynchus Kisutch) and quantified natural selection acting on two important female characters: body size and kype size (a secondary sexual character used for fighting). The strong natural selection that we have found for female competitive ability is presumably the basis for the evolution of female parental care in salmonids.

 

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Title: Evolution of adult female life history and morphology in a Pacific salmon (coho: Oncorhynchus Kisutch)

Year: 1989

Author(s): Ian A Fleming; Mart R. Gross

Type: Journal Article

Description:
Female competition on the spawning grounds can generate strong natural selection on female coho salmon (Oncorhynchus Kisutch). We examined the morphology and investment into egg production of 13 wild and five hatchery populations. For each population, the degrees of breeding competition and migration arduousness were quantified. The results support the importance of breeding competition in the evolution of female morphology and life history.

 

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Title: Salmon escapement records for Area 24, 1967-1989

Year: 1989

Author(s): Dept. of Fisheries and Oceans

Type: Dataset (unpublished)

Description:
none

 

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Title: Fish Survey of S.E. Clayoquot Sound Streams, Vancouver Island

Year: 1989

Author(s): T.G. Brown; B.C. Anderson; J.C. Scrivener; I.V. Williams

Type: Report (published)

Description:
Minnow traps were used to capture juvenile salmonids from six locations in each of the twenty-three S.E. Clayoquot Sound Streams. At each location the environmental features were noted, recorded, and scales were obtained for salmonid age determination. Juvenile coho catch/effort, mean length of one stream surveyed. The mean catch at each location was correlated to various environmental features such as: dominant biogeoclimatic variant, gradient, stream order, stream orientation and stream location.

 

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Title: Fish Survey of S. E. Clayoquot Sound Streams, Vancouver Island

Year: 1989

Author(s): T. G. Brown; B. C. Andersen; J. C. Scrivener; I. V. Williams

Type: Report (published)

Description:
Minnow traps were used to capture juvenile salmonids from six locations in each of twenty-three S. E. Clayoquot Sound streams. At each location, the environmental features were noted, the length and weight of all captured juvenile coho were recorded, and scales were obtained for salmonid age determination. Juvenile coho catch/effort, mean length of one year old coho, and percent two year olds were calculated for each stream surveyed. The mean catch at each location was correlated to various environmental features such as: dominant biogeoclimative variant, gradient, stream order, stream orientation and stream location. The mean catch at each location was also correlated with vegetation type, vegetation age, percentage in-stream cover, cover type, and substrate type. Few results were statistically significant because catches and age compositions were highly variable and sample sizes were small.

 

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Title: Winter diet of Vancouver Island marten (Martes americana)

Year: 1989

Author(s): David W. Nagorsen; Karen F. Morrison; Joan E. Forsberg

Type: Journal Article

Description:
Digestive tracts from 701 martens (Martes americana) of known sex and age taken during the 1983-1986 fur harvests were used to determine winter diet of marten from Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Small mammals, deer, birds and salmonid fish were the major food items. Marten exploited nine species of small mammals including four introduced species, but more than 50% of the small mammal prey were deer mice. We attributed most deer remains to carrion. Avian prey was primarily small passerine and piciform species with Winter Wrens accounting for about 40% of the identifiable bird remains. Salmon remains were from bait consumption and fish exploited during the spawning runs. Although minor intersexual variation in diet was evident with females consuming more small mammals and small birds, dietary overlap between sexes was pronounced in this insular population.

 

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Title: Carnation Creek

Year: 1989

Type: Journal Article

Description:
none

 

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Title: Marine birds and aquaculture in British Columbia. Assessment and Management of interactions.

Year: 1989

Author(s): Jaqueline Booth; Harriet Rueggenberg

Type: Government document

Description:
This report documents the results of Phase II of a project aimed at assessing the effects of BC's growing aquaculture industry on its marine bird populations. In this phase, the extent of geographical overlap between areas of current and potential aquaculture development and areas used by marine birds was examined, indicating the bird species, types of aquaculture and areas of the coast involved.The project is comprised of three phases. Phase I reviewed the relevant literature, describing the nature of interactions that can occur between marine birds and the various types of aquaculture, and providing an analytical framework for the subsequent phases (Booth and Rueggeberg, 1988). In Phase II, a computer database and geographical informations system is developed to examine the overlap between areas of current and potential aquaculture development and areas of marine bird habitat. Phase III consists of two studies that examine on-site interactions between birds and aquaculture, one dealing with salmon farming and the other with mussel farming (Rueggeberg and Booth, 1989.

 

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Title: Marine birds and aquaculture in British Columbia: Assessment and Management of Interactions

Year: 1989

Author(s): H. Rueggenberg; J. Booth

Type: Government document

Description:
This report documents the results of Phase III of a project aimed at assessing the effects of BC's growing aquaculture industry on its marine bird populations. The project is comprised of three phases. Phase I reviewed the relevant literature, describing the nature of interactions that can occur between marine birds and the various types of aquaculture, and providing an analytical framework for the subsequent phases (Booth and Rueggeberg, 1988). In Phase II, a computer database and geographical informations system is developed to examine the overlap between areas of current and potential aquaculture development and areas of marine bird habitat. Phase III consists of two studies that examine on-site interactions between birds and aquaculture, one dealing with salmon farming (Rueggeberg and Booth, 1989) and the other with mussel farming (this report).

 

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Title: Ahousat Chiefs tell of their concern for the environment

Year: 1989

Type: Newspaper Article

Description:
None

 

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Title: Aquaculture Growth Unprecedented

Year: 1988

Type: Newspaper

Description:
Update on aquaculture industry in British Columbia. Also short article, Farmed salmon to rise 1500%.

 

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Title: The Thriving of Wild Salmon

Year: 1988

Author(s): Simon Lucas

Type: Other

Description:
none

 

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Title: Suzuki Foundation Wild Salmon Conference Transcript - Simon Lucas' remarks

Year: 1988

Author(s): Simon Lucas, B.C. Aboriginal Fisheries Commission and Nuu-Chah-Nulth Tribal Council

Type: Newspaper Article

Description:
None