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Your search for Ecological processes returned 67 records. Showing Records 1 to 30. Please Select a Record to View.

 

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Title: Invasive species invading Tofino; attack planned; CWFS help sought

Year: 2014

Author(s): Andrew Bailey

Type: Newspaper Article

Description:
none

 

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Title: Status Update on the Surveillance of Wild Anadromous Salmonids in British Columbia

Year: 2013

Author(s): Aquatic Surveillance and Epidemiology, CFIA

Type: Report (published)

Description:
none

 

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Title: West Coast Nature Notes: Wickaninnish dunes setting for war on alien species

Year: 2013

Author(s): Andrew Bailey

Type: Newspaper Article

Description:
none

 

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Title: The persistence and stability of fish assemblages within eelgrass meadows (Zostera marina) on the Pacific coast of Canada

Year: 2013

Author(s): Cliff Robinson, Marine Protected Areas Research Group, UVic; Jennifer Yakimishyn, Pacific Rim National Parks Reserve

Type: Journal Article

Description:
The persistence and stability of fish assemblages found in 34 eelgrass (Zostera marina) meadows along the British Columbia coast was examined from 2004 to 2011. Assemblage persistence (nontrending species composition) and assemblage stability (constancy in abundance over time) were assessed using a time-lag regression method that tests for temporal turnover within short time series. Overall, 85 percent of the fish assemblages persisted, and 80 percent of the assemblages exhibited stability in abundance over the 8-year study. Environmental conditions in 33 of 34 meadows did not change substantially over the 8 years, and the low interannual variability may have contributed to the high persistence and stability of the fish assemblages. The lack of temporal turnover in relatively undisturbed eelgrass fish assemblage properties is a critical element for effective monitoring of coastal ecosystem integrity.

 

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Title: Park looks to locals in war on invasive plants

Year: 2012

Author(s): Andrew Bailey

Type: Newspaper Article

Description:
"Pacific Rim National Park Reserve is seeking volunteers to assist with removing invasive plant species from the area."

 

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Title: Pacific Ocean Acid Levels Jeopardizing Marine Life

Year: 2012

Author(s): Greg Rasmussen

Type: Other

Description:
"The Pacific Ocean is growing more acidic at a much faster rate that anticipated, putting everything from corals to mussels jeopardy."

 

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Title: Could acidic waters ruin B.C.'s shellfish industry?

Year: 2012

Author(s): Jenna Owsianik

Type: Other

Description:
None

 

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Title: Eelgrass and fish assemblage properties as indicators of biotic integrity in the Clayoquot Sound Biosphere Reserve.

Year: 2012

Author(s): Cliff Robinson; Jennifer Yakimishyn

Type: Report (unpublished)

Description:
The conservation of biological diversity within the Clayoquot Sound Biosphere Reserve (CSBR) is a key element needed to drive the production of ecosystem services for long-term sustainable use by local communities. The main objective of this study was to develop a simple framework for the Clayoquot Biosphere Trust (CBT) to assess fish diversity in eelgrass meadows using a multimetric approach. Eelgrass (Zostera marina) was chosen as a focal habitat because it is globally considered to be one of the most ecologically important coastal habitats providing a variety of commercially, recreational and ecologically important fish species with outstanding feeding and growing potential, and shelter from many piscivorous and avian predators. This study evaluated three eelgrass metrics (water column nitrate concentration, leaf area index, and epiphyte load) and 12 metrics describing fish assemblage species composition, assemblage abundance, proportion of indicator species groups (e.g., fishery species), nursery function, and trophic function. The abundance of one resident iconic species, the Bay pipefish, was also considered. Metric values for eelgrass and fish assemblages were determined for 6 meadows sampled by the CBT in 2008 and 2011, and compared to metric values derived for 22 meadows sampled in Clayoquot Sound (CS) by Pacific Rim National Park Reserve from 2004-2012. The framework allows for evaluation of eelgrass and fish assemblage metrics by comparing CBT meadow values to the distribution of natural variability observed in metric values from 114 observations made elsewhere in Clayouqot Sound. If 3of 12 fish metrics (one quarter) for each CBT meadow fell below the 10th percentile of the 114 CS observations then potential impairment in the fish assemblage was considered. Overall, two major conclusions were made from this analysis and can contribute to CBT vital signs monitoring. First as of 2011, the 6 CBT meadows appear healthy because none of the eelgrass metric values were found near the thresholds for potential impairment. Second, five out of six fish assemblages appeared in good condition in 2011, but CBT Meadow Bawden Bay had 3 out of 12 fish metrics fall below threshold values and it should be re-sampled to confirm for potential impairment. Overall, the limited eelgrass sampling by CBT has demonstrated that meadows are healthy and likely functioning within natural variability. Two major recommendations were made: 1) continue to sample the 6 CBT meadows to build a long term understanding of temporal variability in fish diversity, and 2) map eelgrass distribution and continue to sample fish assemblages in CSBR to better describe and understand the spatial variability in meadow structure and function. Overall, the framework presented will aid the CBT in monitoring the vital signs of fish diversity in ecologically important eelgrass ecosystems.

 

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Title: Restoring the Balance for Climate and Species

Year: 2011

Author(s): Jens Wieting, Sierra Club BC

Type: Brochure

Description:
none

 

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Title: kwaqmis (siihmuu,siihbuu) Herring Spawn

Year: 2010

Author(s): Uu-a-thluk; Nuu-chah-nulth Tribal Council Fisheries

Type: Book

Description:
none

 

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Title: Glistening Patches of Gold: The Environmental History of Scotch Broom (Cytisus scoparus) on Southern Vancouver Island, 1848-1950

Year: 2010

Author(s): Troy V. Lee

Type: Journal Article

Description:
none

 

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Title: Environmental Monitoring and Assessment

Year: 2006

Author(s):

Type: Book

Description:
From front cover:"An international journal devoted to progress in the use of monitoring data in assessing environmental risks to Man and the environment."

 

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Title: Notes on recent breeding of common murres at Starlight Reef and Cleland Island, British Columbia

Year: 2006

Author(s): Harry Carter; Ken Morgan; Trudy Chatwin; Francis Bruhwiler

Type: Journal Article

Description:
Breeding by relatively small numbers of Common Murres (Uria aalge) was reported in 1969-82 at Cleland Island, Florencia Islet and Starlight Reef on the central west coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia. No evidence of breeding or colony attendance has been reported since 1982. In 1989, one egg was found on Starlight Reef, likely indicated continued sporadic breeding by isolated pairs at this location. In 2006, five to 10 murres regularly attended and at least two pairs probably bred at a new breeding area on Cleland Island, but eggs or chicks were not seen. Since 1982, sporadic attendance without breeding also has occurred at Murre Reef, the previous breeding area at Cleland Island in 1969-1982.

 

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Title: An assessment of abundance and growth of the sea otter population (Enhydra lutris) in British Columbia.

Year: 2005

Author(s): L.M. Nichol, Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Pacific Region; L.C. Watson, Malaspina University College; G.M. Ellis, Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Pacific Region; J.K.B. Ford, Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Pacific Region

Type: Report (published)

Description:
Sea otters were re-introduced to British Columbia from Alaska between 1969 and 1972. The first population count was made in 1977. Since 1988, field surveys have been undertaken using small boat or helicopter, to determine sea otter population abundance and trends in British Columbia. Our goal in this study was to assess the survey procedure in use and to obtain current population counts.

 

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Title: Humpback comeback on West Coast.

Year: 2005

Author(s): Jennifer Dart, The Westerly Newspaper

Type: Newspaper Article

Description:
Humpback whales have been returning in substantial numbers to the inshore waters of the west coast of Vancouver Island over the past few years. According to local researchers this trend is mirrored throughout the Pacific Northwest and marks the slow resurgence of the humpback population over the last half century.

 

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Title: Nearshore oceanography and planktonic prey (family Porcellanidae) of gray whales, Eschrichtius robustus, in Clayoquot Sound, British Columbia.

Year: 2005

Author(s): Kecia Alene Kerr

Type: Academic Thesis

Description:
Gray whales in Clayoquot Sound occasionally feed on dense patches of porcelain crab larvae. The irregular timing and extent of patches prompted interest in factors influencing larval distribution and abundance. M.Sc. Thesis, University of Victoria

 

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Title: Sea lions getting gnarly with surfers

Year: 2004

Author(s): The Westerly Newspaper

Type: Newspaper Article

Description:
by Bob Hansen, PNRP Wildlife Specialist The Westerly News July 7, 2004 Wick Beach, August 31, 2004, high-tide, the day after the big swell came through....there were about 12 - 15 people surfing west of Wick Centre. Sea lions were coming up, maybe one or two popping their heads up by groups of surfers. At some point a sea lion came right up behind one experienced surfer, putting its head up out of the water. Since this often happens the surfer was not concerned.

 

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Title: Mowachaht/Muchalaht keep Tsu-xiit free

Year: 2004

Author(s): David Wiwchar, Ha-shilth-sa Newspaper

Type: Newspaper Article

Description:
Elder Gloria Maquinna stands at the end of the partially submerged dock, rasies her hands towards the sky and dances to her late husband's paddle song, along with two of her granddaughters. Behind them, dozens of canoe paddlers, drummers and community members sing their ancient songs, hoping to pull Tsu-xiit away from his DFO captors. After an hour, with singing voices growing hoarse, and dancers cold and wet in the southeast gales, Mowachaht/Muchalaht community members slowly retreat from the Gold River docks, obviously saddened that the young killer whale was still across the harbour inside an area protected by high-powered Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) and RCMP boats.

 

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Title: Stewardship plan in pace for Tsu-xiit

Year: 2004

Author(s): David Wiwchar, Ha-shilth-sa Newspaper

Type: Newspaper Article

Description:
The sun hasn't even broken over the mountaintops as workers at the Muchalaht Marina start their day talking with visiting boaters about Tsu-xiit (Luna). Handing out pamphlets to anglers, they hope to educate boaters about the dangers of interacting with the area's most famous marine mammal, before more controversial interactions occur.

 

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Title: DFO backs stewardship guardians

Year: 2004

Author(s): David Wiwchar, Ha-shilth-sa Newspaper

Type: Newspaper Article

Description:
Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) is satisfied with the job Mowachaht/Muchalaht has done in keeping Tsu-xiit away from commercial fishing vessels and pleasure boats, according to Acting Regional Director Don Radford.

 

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Title: Temporary colonization of Cleland Island, British Columbia, by common murres from 1969-82

Year: 2004

Author(s): Harry R. Carter

Type: Journal Article

Description:
Small numbers of Common Murres (Uria aalge) temporarily bred at Cleland Island on the central west coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia, from 1969-82, but the cirumstances surrounding this brief colonization event have not been previously assessed. This colonization, and breeding attempts at three other nearby sites (Florencia Island, "White" Islet, and Starlight Reef) between the late 1960s and early 1980s, may have reflected a temporary expansion of the murre population form Washington under suitable source population conditions (i.e., after a period of population growth in Washington) and suitable nesting habitat conditiosn at sites along the central west coast of Vancouver Island (i.e., availability of bare rock habitat on predator-free islands with low disturbance). However, long-term breeding did not develop at these colonies. Possible reasons for abandonement include: a) the relatively short period of a few decades of population growth at Washington colonies which ended abruptly in 1983 and was followed by population decline; b) limited suitable breeding habitats on the central west coast of Vancouver Island, contributing to small colony size without growth and sufficient recruitment; c0 disturbance of breeding birds by humans and Bald Eaagles (Haliateetus leucocephalus); and d) mortality of breeding birds or their progeny from natural mortality, gill-net fishing, and oil spills.

 

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Title: A multi-scale analysis of habitat use by gray whales (Eschrichtius robustus) in Clayoquot Sound, British Columbia.

Year: 2003

Author(s): Sonya Kari Meier

Type: Academic Thesis

Description:
Clayoquot Sound, an area on the west coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada is a tertiary feeding area used by eastern gray whales ('Eschrichtius robustus'). The objective of this study was to determine the role of depth and seafloor relief in whale feeding habitat selection. M.Sc. Thesis, University of Victoria

 

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Title: Tofino Mudflats Wildlife Management Area Management Plan

Year: 2002

Author(s): M. Eggen; S. Diggon; A. Mason

Type: Report (unpublished)

Description:
A management plan for the Tofino Mudflats Wildlife Management Area (WMA) was initiated by the BC Ministry of Water, Land and Air Protection (MWLAP). The main objectives of the management plan were to provide a current ecological and human use description, an integrated management strategy that strives to protect the natural resources of the WMA, and a plan for a wildlife viewing network. Current information on ecological and human use was collected from existing documented sources and through consultations with the public, local governments and organizations. A consultation process was initiated in order to gather and incorporate community input in planning for management of the WMA. The Tofino Mudflats WMA is defined by its jurisdictional boundaries; however, it is ecologically connected with surrounding marine and terrestrial environments at local, regional and international levels. These connects are reflected in the management plan.

 

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Title: Spring Shorebird Migration at Tofino Mudflats.

Year: 2001

Author(s): Moira Lemon, Canadian Wildlife Service; Rob Butler, Canadian Wildlife Service

Type: Journal Article

Description:
This articles presents the results of a shorebird census (spring abundance) conducted in the spring of 1995.

 

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Title: Habitat, population structure and energy value of benthis amphipods and implications for gray whale foraging in Clayoquot Sound, British Columbia.

Year: 2001

Author(s): Erin Hana Carruthers

Type: Academic Thesis

Description:
The majority of Eastern Pacific gray whales ('Eschrichtius robustus ')migrate from southern breeding grounds to the Bering and Chukchi seas where they feed principally on benthic amphipods throughout the summer. However, increasing numbers are now summering in locales along the coast locales along the coast of Oregon, Washington and British Columbia. Clayoquot Sound on the west coast of Vancouver Island is one area where gray whales are known to summer in relatively large numbers. M.Sc. Thesis, Queen's University